Car Strikes Gasoline Tanker, Leading to Los Angeles Freeway Inferno

Sunday, April 08, 2012 |

LOS ANGELES - The collision of a sedan and gasoline tanker led to a spectacular blaze on the Ventura Freeway near Glendale late Saturday night, that snarled traffic for hours but thankfully caused no injury.


video from kd6nux


The crash and fire on the westbound lanes of the 134 Freeway transition to the southbound Golden State (I-5) Freeway, was reported to the Los Angeles Fire Department on Saturday, April 7, 2012 at 11:09 PM, bringing the rapid response of more than 150 firefighters from the LAFD as well as automatic aid from the Burbank, Glendale and Bob Hope Airport Fire Departments.

Firefighters arrived quickly to find a semi-truck tanker with a twin tank trailer, carrying a capacity load of 9,000 gallons of gasoline, to be fully enveloped in fire, after being struck by a compact sedan. Despite the inferno and a long trail of flames, both drivers were able to flee their vehicles without injury.

With thousands of gallons of flammable fuel already spilled and ablaze, first arriving firefighters carefully staged their apparatus and command post uphill and upwind, as they attacked a wall of flame more than 20 feet tall.Tanker Erupts in Flames Following Los Angeles Freeway Collision

Local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol quickly curtailed traffic on and seeking to enter the busy freeway interchange, aiding the effort to prevent injury and environmental harm.

Firefighters labored for 70 minutes to fully extinguish the flames and dike the flow of as much as 3,000 gallons of unburned gasoline, to prevent it from igniting or entering storm drains.

No injuries were reported, and there were no evacuations.

Following the Fire Deparment's mitigation of primary hazards, control of the scene was returned jointly to the California Highway Patrol, County of Los Angeles Health Hazardous Materials Division and the California Department of Transportation, with the latter agency to perform a detailed physical assessment of the overpass for possible fire related damage.
Dispatched LAFD Units: E76 E56 RA56 E250 T50 BC5 FT100 E100 FT36 E36 E235 T35 E86 E60 T60 E260 E82 E220 T20 SQ21 DC3 EM2 BC14 EA1 E21 T21 E221 H0D H0F BC2 BC11 H4 H3 E29 E90 T90 E290 E289 T89 E12 E10 H0B H6 SQ87 E87 T87 E287
[ photos ] [ slideshow ] [ video ]

Submitted by Shawn Lenske and Brian Humphrey, Spokesmen
Los Angeles Fire Department

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Great work by the professionals at the LAFD. No loss of life, no injuries, and the freeway did not sustain permanent damage.

Although damage was estimated to be approx $250,000 it could have been much higher and traffic in the area heavily impacted were it not for the quick and agressive attack by over 150 firefighters with specialized equipment (foam rigs, helicopters, hazmat units, etc).

Once again the LAFD has shown why they need to be fully funded. Due to proper staffing and available equipment, this emergency incident was mitigated.

The politicians, CAO Santana and the citizens need to remember incidents such these when talk rolls around about cutting the fire department.

Thanks for all that you do.

Anonymous said...

Is there a written document anywhere listing all the apparatus codes (ie FT=Foam Tender, EA=Emergency Air) etc.

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous 1:51,

Thank you for sharing your thoughts. We encourage Los Angeles residents to keep their local elected leaders aware of their concerns and observations - ditto members of the fire service, their labor representatives.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous 7:35,

There is sadly no complete roster of such information presently on-line - though you grasped the obvious.

While it is certainly on our list of things to offer - likely after a significant update to the Department's computer aided dispatching system, the backlog of projects - including outdated information at the LAFD.ORG site, will have such a project remain waiting for the foreseeable future.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Post a Comment

Comments to this blog are approved or disapproved without editing.

We seek to offer a broad cross-section of *public* thoughts that are specific to the topic at hand and genuinely polite in tone - regardless of opinion.

Kindly post your comments below.