LAFD's 9-1-1 Dispatch Center Made Historical Move

Tuesday, February 28, 2012 |

 Los Angeles Fire Department's (LAFD) dispatch center, known for it's motto, "It all starts here", made a historic move today. During the early morning hours of February 28, 2012, 9-1-1 call taking and resource dispatching moved locations from the Operations Control Division (OCD) at City Hall East to the new Metropolitan Fire Communications (MFC) facility at 500 E. Temple Street.

LAFD's "New" Dispatch Center, Metropolitan Fire Communications (MFC)Now that the the transition to MFC is complete, OCD has become the Department’s back-up dispatching facility and the radio call sign "OCD" is no longer operative. At one in the morning, the strategically planned five hour radio transfer was made. Now, all inbound and outbound radio transmissions will use the call sign, “Metro.” No other changes to radio terminology, resource dispatch algorithms, or operations will occur.

In addition, LAFD's Public Service Office (PSO) made the same geographical migration. Matt Spence, Brian Humphrey, and Erik Scott sincerely appreciate the patience of all during this exciting and elaborate transition, as they have had decreased availability at times. As for members of the media, the phone number for the PSO EPI-Center will remain the same, for the time being. We and look forward to better serving you from our new location.

Construction of the Metro Fire Communications facility which includes Fire Station 4 and the City’s Emergency Operations Center, began on January 19, 2006 as part of Prop “F” funding. Although the 120,000 square foot facility has been up and running for the past couple of years, the Metro Fire Communications sophisticated 9-1-1 telephone and dispatch equipment installation was just recently completed.

LAFD's "Old" Dispatch Center, Operations Control Division (OCD

The move to the new Metro Fire Communications facility involves many City agencies, Vendors, and private contractors. Planning for the actual transition from City Hall East to the MFC has been in the works for the last several months, which includes the training of dispatchers and staff for familiarization of new state of the art equipment. As of February 29, 2012, the Coldwater back-up dispatch center will no longer be operational. The Department appreciates your interest and cooperation in this historic move.

Some have recently said, the previous commonly used ending radio transmission, "OCD Clear", now takes on a new meaning.

Submitted by Administration & Erik Scott, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Will the end of calls in quarters still end with, "OCD clear," or will this be changed to incorporate Metro?

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Dear Anonymous,

No, the end of calls in quarters will not end with, "OCD clear". Actually, as mentioned the radio call sign "OCD" is no longer operative, and all inbound and outbound radio transmissions will use the call sign, “Metro.”

Thanks for asking.

Respectfully,

Erik Scott
Firefighter/Paramedic, Spokesman
C-Shift Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

"Serving with Courage, Integrity & Pride"

Anonymous said...

Does it work yet or is the Department still on radio watch?

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous 1:28,

Thanks for the note. The new LAFD Metropolitan Fire Communications (MFC) center is operating as is typical and planned for such facilities.

While the less-than-ideal status of units on "radio watch" can lead those outside the fire service to think something is amiss, today's status of LAFD units monitoring their radios did not involve components within the new facility, but rather necessary attention to a critical nine year-old component at the home of our *former* dispatch center.

It is essential for us to convey that all but one of the *dozens* of independent systems utilized to process LAFD 9-1-1 calls was operating optimally today. Emergency calls were accepted, routed, processed and dispatched with tones and gongs, activating fire station lights and teletypes and mobile data computers with full information in a brisk and efficient manner.

All that was different today (and hopefully not for much longer) was the need for field units to simultaneously monitor their assigned radio frequency.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

California Fire news said...

Spanking new quarters for the best Public Safety Agency #SMEM team in California. Congrats!

Anonymous said...

So what do you say now Mr. Humphrey, now that the L.A. Times has exposed the truth?

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

@California Fire News,

Thank you for your kind words and well-wishes in what have been trying times for all members of the LAFD.

@Anonymous 10:59,

I strongly stand by the comments above at the time they were offered - a week prior to the escalation of concerns and technical issues that have rightfully been chronicled in the press.

While things were far from "rosey" on March 1, they were typical in my experience for a new dispatch center. I could sadly not have foretold what would happen in the days that followed.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

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