Click here for the LAFD entry level Firefighter Job Bulletin

'Thunderous Explosion' in Sylmar Sends Three Men to Hospital

Wednesday, August 10, 2011 |

SYLMAR - A "thunderous explosion" that ripped the roof from a Sylmar business and sent three men to the hospital, remains under investigation by local and State authorities.

A flurry of 9-1-1 calls reporting the explosion commenced at 4:20PM on Tuesday, August 9, 2011, bringing dozens of Los Angeles Fire Department personnel to a normally quiet foothill industrial park at 12349 Gladstone Avenue in the northeast San Fernando Valley.

Arriving quickly, firefighters found missing doors, buckled masonry walls, widely scattered debris and large portions of the roof blown over the parapets of a 50' x 150' section of a 7,400 square-foot one-and-two story building. There was however, no evidence of fire. With paper debris still floating in the air, LAFD crews developed a perimeter for bystander exclusion as they established a command post uphill and upwind of the incident.


Swiftly surveying the scene, firefighters quickly came to the aid of two critically injured men who had apparently been blown from the cinder-block building by the force of the explosion. With early reports of additional victims, an unknown cause - and others who may have been missing, neighborhood firefighters were soon joined by more than one hundred colleagues, including LAFD Hazardous Material and Urban Search & Rescue experts, in a detailed search for the cause and effect of the blast, which was heard and felt over a one-mile area.

The two badly injured men were rushed to trauma centers by LAFD Paramedics, as a methodical examination of the premises found no trapped or missing persons. More than 15 minutes after the search concluded, a man walked up to the command post seeking medical care for unspecified injury from the blast. He was taken in good condition by LAFD ambulance to a nearby hospital for further evaluation.

An estimate of monetary loss to the heavily damaged business, described only as an "alternative fuel and green energy firm", was still being tabulated early Wednesday.

Though the enterprise reportedly used pressure vessels and was involved in the "extraction of hydrogen from water", the specific cause of the explosion remains under active investigation by the Los Angeles Fire Department Arson/Counter-Terrorism Section and Cal/OSHA officials.


Dispatched Units: E98 RA898 RA98 E91 E275 T75 E24 E287 T87 BC12 E77 T98 E298 RA91 RA7 RA77 RA87 EM15 EM14 EM17 BC15 BC10 UR89 E89 T89 E289 UR88 E88 T88 E288 RA889 DC3 E87 SQ87 AR2 AR23 RA75 E39 EL83 AR3 AR10 BC10 EM15

(slideshow)

Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

You listed some units twice.

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous 4:16,

Thanks for the note - and your eagle eye!

As mentioned in the comments of this earlier post, we are experimenting with a display of units that were dispatched [emphasis added] during the course of an incident, which may not coincide fully with those that are actually assigned, committed or working at the incident scene.

In other words, one or more of the listed units may be cancelled or reassigned before leaving the station or arriving at the incident.

In this case of such a *long and involved* incident, such units as BC10 for example, were dispatched, assigned, committed and working and later released - only to return to the scene several hours later to perform additional tasks.

I hope this information helps. Thanks for your interest in the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous,

NOTE: We were regretfully unable to approve your comment due to the URL included in your message. We do however, believes it deserves a reply!

We appreciate your kind words regarding our effort [emphasis] to list dispatched LAFD units in our after-action reports.

Given present constraints within our one-man office, we are sadly unable at this time to color-code dispatched units in the manner you suggest. Thanks for offering the suggestion, which we may indeed act upon in the future.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Post a Comment

Comments to this blog are approved or disapproved without editing.

We seek to offer a broad cross-section of *public* thoughts that are specific to the topic at hand and genuinely polite in tone - regardless of opinion.

Kindly post your comments below.