Click here for the LAFD entry level Firefighter Job Bulletin

1 Dead, 3 Injured in Dramatic Downtown Crash

Thursday, January 31, 2008 |

On Thursday, January 31, 2008 at 7:08 PM, 4 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 3 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 EMS Battalion Captain and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 29 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief Raymundo Gomez, responded to a Civilian Fatality Traffic Collision with Fire and Entrapment near 522 East 7th Street in the Fashion District of downtown Los Angeles.

Firefighters arrived quickly to discover a four vehicle collision with one vehicle on the southwest corner of 7th Street and San Pedro Street completely engulfed in flames, after shearing a fire hydrant and coming to rest against a light standard.

Despite the LAFD's rapid response and fire extinguishment, the one occupant of the burning and barely recognizable passenger car proved beyond their help, and was declared deceased at the scene.

That severely damaged vehicle and water used to extinguish it, as well as runoff from the sheared fire hydrant, remained energized by exposed utility wires until skilfully secured by Department of Water and Power employees.

Two of the five persons involved in the collision, as well as one pedestrian witness, were taken to the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center for non-life threatening injuries. The remaining persons declined treatment and transportation.

A positive identification of the person who died, including their age and gender, as well as the precise cause, time and manner of their death will be determined by Coroner's officials.

Circumstances regarding the traffic collision remain the focus of an active Los Angeles Police Department investigation.

(video) (video)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Homes in Watts Succumb to Early Morning Blaze

Tuesday, January 29, 2008 |

On Tuesday, January 29, 2008 at 5:13 AM, 14 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 3 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 2 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 1 Foam Tender, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 3 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 99 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief Jerome Boyd, responded to a Greater Alarm Structure Fire near 1701 East 112th Street in Watts.

Firefighters arrived quickly to find a pair of adjacent 2 story residential dwellings under construction and fully involved with fire, the flames threatening occupied structures to the east and west.

A swift and well-coordinated defensive operation with large hose streams held the bulk of the fire to the non-occupied buildings, which were awaiting the application of siding or stucco in their final stage of construction.

The flames were extinguished in just 26 minutes and no injuries were reported.

Structural loss from the fire is estimated at $425,000. This sum includes exterior thermal damage ($20,000) to a neighboring two story duplex, and lesser impact ($5,000) to an adjacent single family dwelling. There were also four vehicles that sustained unspecified damage.

The cause of this early morning blaze is attributed to combustibles discarded by transients.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Two Rescued When Car Plunges Off Freeway Into Flood Control Channel

Sunday, January 27, 2008 |

Vehicle Recovered from Arroyo Seco. © Photo by Mike Meadows. Click to view more...On Sunday, January 27, 2008 at 7:56 AM, 6 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 3 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Heavy Rescue, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, and 3 Swift Water Teams all under the direction of Battalion Chief Richard Elder responded to a Traffic Collision at Avenue 43 and the Pasadena Freeway in Lincoln Heights/Solano Canyon.


A car traveling northbound on the Pasadena Freeway jettisoned off the freeway, landing in a flood control channel which runs parallel to the freeway. The car came to rest on it's wheels, some 30 feet below the freeway.

Fortunately, even though the area was inundated with heavy rains at the time, the water traveling down the flood control channel was less than 6 inches deep. Both occupants of the car were able to self extricate themselves and were found standing in the water.

Both patients, a 29 year-old female and a 35 year-old female were able to move to the outer edge of the wash where Firefighters were able to assess and stabilize them prior to hoisting them to the roadway above. The patients were removed from the channel using a litter basket/hoist operation and transported to Los Angeles County - USC Medical Center for evaluation. One patient sustained minor injuries and the other patient sustained serious, non-life threatening injuries. The cause of the incident is under investigation by the CHP.


Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Helicopter Crash on L.A. Freeway Kills One

Saturday, January 26, 2008 |

Small helicopter crashes on Los Angeles Freeway. © Photo by Mike Meadows. Click to view more...On Friday, January 25, 2008 at 11:01 PM, 6 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Heavy Rescue, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, under the direction of Battalion Chief Randy Beaty responded to a Helicopter Crash on the S/B 110 Freeway at Century Bl. in South Los Angeles.

Firefighters arrived on the scene to discover the burning wreckage of a small, single or twin seat helicopter which had crashed in the South-Bound lanes of the Harbor Freeway. The fire was quickly extinguished, unfortunately one individual was found deceased in the fuselage of the aircraft. Small helicopter crashes on Los Angeles Freeway. © Photo by Mike Meadows. Click to view more...Debris from the crash littered the freeway for several hundred feet around the crash site. No other injuries were reported. The cause of the crash is under investigation.
Photos

Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Major Emergency Fire Damages Apartments

Thursday, January 24, 2008 |

On Thursday, January 24, 2008 at 5:58 PM, 23 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 10 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 4 Heavy Rescues, 1 Arson Unit, 4 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 5 EMS Battalion Captains, 7 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, Emergency Air 2, Rehab Tender 40, a Housing Dept. Representative, Street Maintenance, MTA, DOT, DWP and LAPD, all under the direction of Assistant Chief Donald Austin, responded to a Major Emergency Structure Fire at 1006 W. 42nd St. in Exposition Park/Coliseum Area.

The frantic calls into the OCD Dispatch Center confirmed there was a structure fire in the area. The first arriving Engine on scene reported that a one story, "E" shaped, Pre-33 building of apartments located over small commercial occupancies with fire and heavy smoke showing from one apartment unit. As the call for additional companies was made, the fire started self ventilating through the roof of the occupancy. The fire, having had a substantial head start, quickly spread to adjacent units and the attic as Firefighters diligently extended hoselines in concert with the ventilation team, who worked aggressively trying to prevent the spread of the fire throughout the attic of the building, even in the pouring rain.

Early on in the firefight, one Firefighter sustained a minor ankle injury and no other injuries were reported. It took 185 Firefighters 33 minutes to call a knockdown. The fire damage was contained to four units and seven other units experienced heavy smoke and water damage. The Pre-33 structure, comprised of approximately 20 apartments and 10 businesses, was equipped with smoke detectors but was not required to have sprinklers. The cause and dollar loss estimate are undetermined pending the completion of the fire investigation. The Red Cross and the Housing Department were called to assist twenty five to thirty residents with their housing needs. Councilwoman Jan Perry, presiding over District 9, was also available and extended the assistance of her office in the relocation of the residents. The building owner will be required to maintain a fire watch until the building systems are restored.

Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

95 Years Ago: Firemen Kissed at the Hotel Brennan

Wednesday, January 23, 2008 |

Members of the Los Angeles Fire Department, their friends, family and curious fire buffs, often ask about a stirring and omnipresent image from our horse-drawn era, the photograph and graphic seen below.

LAFD SteamerLos Angeles Firemen's Credit Union

While many recognize the image and derivatives, used over the years by our Department and affiliated organizations such as the Los Angeles Firemen's Credit Union and the Los Angeles Firemen's Relief Association, precious few recall the conflagration the steamer was responding to.

Fire at the Hotel Brennan in Los Angeles 1913

The landmark blaze, believed to be the most photographed fire during LAFD's horse drawn operations (1877-1921), injured 30 firemen and nearly cost the Chief of the Department his life.

It is a story like no other - with moviemakers placing actors and actresses in the action with feigned rescues so as to take advantage of the backdrop. It was a five-story inferno known as...

Fire at the Hotel Brennan:

Los Angeles Examiner
January 24, 1913

Fed by paints, oils and wallpaper of the stock of the Los Angeles Wallpaper and Paint Company, at 529 South Main street, a fire, discovered shortly before 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon, swept from top to bottom of the five-story building with the fierceness of flames in a furnace, inflicting a loss of about $100,000 and furnishing a thrilling spectacle to many thousands of persons during the stubborn fight which lasted till nightfall before the firemen had conquered. The fire started in the rear part of the ground floor of the paint company's store, but the cause of it is not known. As soon as Chief Eley arrived he saw the seriousness of the menace and a second and a third alarm followed in rapid succession, until all of the fire companies of the central portion of the city were massed in the struggle to keep the flames within the four walls and save what could be saved from the burning building.

Fire Chief Eley, but lately risen from a sick bed, led his men with persistent courage, forcing his way again and again into the gas-choked basement and the first floor, until a final venture into the death tap almost cost him his life.

An explosion of turpentine casks had thrown a group of firemen out through a basement entrance and had covered another group with a mass of wallpaper from shattered shelving. Immediately following the rescue of these men, just before 5 o'clock, Chief Eley, who had already fainted twice from exertion and exposure to choking fumes, made his way from the rear alley forward through the basement, determined to learn personally if there were other stocks of explosive oils that would endanger the lives of his firemen.

Presently the absence of the chief was noticed, and a dozen firemen began a frantic search for him.

Firemen J. Reyes of Engine Company No.5 came upon the chief, lying unconscious on the basement floor about 35 feet from the Main street front.

Reyes picked Chief Eley up in his arms and carried him to the front and up a ladder through the sidewalk door. Eley was hurried to the Hospital of the Good Samaritan, unconscious and in a serious condition. He was treated with oxygen, and after an hour recovered consciousness. Late last night he was reported by the physicians in charge to be resting easy and in no danger.


J. Reyes, fifty years later as Captain Reyes (retired), stated that Chief Eley tripped and fell through an open shipping hatch into nine feet of hot water and turpentine in the basement. Reyes, assigned to Engine Co.5, left his company and entered the hot water and rescued the chief swimming to the hatch opening where Eley was lifted out of the water with a pike pole. Reyes himself became extremely ill from inhaling the turpentine fumes and the hot water he swallowed making the rescue. However, he was not taken to the hospital or listed among those treated. According to Capt. Reyes, as he recalls the incident, Assistant Chief O'Donnell threatened to dismiss Reyes for leaving his company, but Capt. Stephen Queirolo, a natural leader during those early days, threatened to leave the job if Reyes was penalized for his bravery so the matter was dropped. Reyes received no recognition for his act.


FALSE REPORT CAUSES GLOOM

Shortly after the chief was taken away in the ambulance the word spread among the firemen that he was dying, and they continued the fight under a pall of sadness in that belief.

The four upper floors of the burned building were occupied by the Hotel Brennan. The lodgers had ample warning, and all had left the lodging house before there was any danger to life.

The value of stock of the paint company is placed at $60,000. It is a total loss.

The furniture of the Brennan was worth about $15,000, and it is almost entirely destroyed by the fire and water.

The building, owned by Gustave Brenner of San Francisco, is estimated to have been worth about $75,000, and half of that is the estimate of loss. None of the walls fell.

Wing's Cafe, a chop suey place, which occupied one of the ground floor rooms adjacent to the paint company, suffered a loss of about $5,000.

PROPERTY WELL INSURED

Insurance of $67,500 was carried on the building. The paint company carried insurance to the amount of $20,000. S.M. Green, proprietor of the Brennan, had $10,000 insurance on his furniture, and the cafe was insured to the amount of $3,000.

From 2 o'clock until after 6 Main street and Fifth and Sixth streets were blocked to traffic. Masses of spectators were packed against the ropes at the street corners, and thousands more watched the fire from the roofs of the Kerkoff, Central, Pacific Electric, Security and other tall buildings in the vicinity.

A portion of the matinee audience at the Burbank theater had reached the house before the streets were closed, and most of them sat through the play, in ignorance of the thrilling scenes in real life that were being enacted just on the other side of the swinging doors.

The Optic theater, next door to the paint store, was filled with an audience watching the moving pictures when the fire was discovered. The manager announced that an accident to the film mechanism compelled a suspension of the entertainment, and the theater was emptied without confusion.

GALLANT FIREMEN KISSED

Rehearsal was on at the Century theater, just north of the burning building. The stage was drenched with water and the rehearsal and evening performance were abandoned. The chorus girls, in their makeup, watched the fire, and, in their enthusiasm over the daring shown by the firemen, rewarded some of them with kisses as they came out of the smoke-filled storerooms for breathing spells.

There were thrilling rescues of women in grave peril, but the women were moving picture actresses and the rescuers were actors with terra cotta complexions and black, cornice-like eyebrows. The "movies" man was on hand within half an hour of the time the fire started, with camera and company, and seizing a time when the ladies in front were not in use, the brave rescuers carried limp women down them, while the cameraman worked his crank and shouted hoarse directions.

So realistic was all this that a policeman was deceived and, rushing forward, seized an apparently unconscious girl from the arms of an actor and was rushing to an ambulance with her when her friends effected a genuine rescue.

THIRTY FIREMAN OVERCOME

Probably in all thirty firemen were overcome temporarily by the gas inside the building. Some of them were revived and returned to their work. Firemen were taken to hospitals for treatment.

A second and then a third alarm brought all the downtown fire apparatus to the scene. Twenty lines of hose poured their streams into the building from Main street, from the alley in the rear and from the roofs of the buildings across the alley.

Four engines, the tower, two hook and ladder trucks and three of four hose wagons were grouped at the Main street front. Two engines were at Sixth and Main, and three at Fifth and Main streets, and three more at the Fifth street mouth of the alley in which there was a cluster of ladder and hose trucks.

The firemen fought against great odds, as the combustible stock of the paint store, in the rear of which the fire started, blazed fiercely in spite of the torrents of water that were poured upon it. The flames swept up an air shaft and spread to every floor of the hotel, and down into the basement, where most of the paints and oils were stored. Embers fell all about the block, but with the competent force and equipment Chief Eley had brought to the contest, there was at no time any real danger of the fire spreading beyond the four walls.

Mayor Alexander was on the scene and occasionally lent a hand at tugging at a line of hose. Later he visited the Receiving Hospital and shook hands with each of the injured firemen, congratulating them on the courage with which they had fought till overcome.

RIVAL POLITICIANS ON SCENE

Meyer Lissner, whose Lissner building abuts on the alley directly opposite the burned building, watched the fire closely. It is a coincidence that Gustave Brenner, owner of the structure that burned, was chairman of the rump Republican State convention, held at the time Lissner as chairman of the Republican State Central committee, was directing the activities of the faction in control.

The most tense period of the fight came at a time when thousands of watchers thought the spectacle was ended. A sullen roar came from the basement, the muffled report of an explosion, presumably of turpentine casks.

Lieutenant J. Smith, R. Conklin and Ed Welte of Engine Company No.24 were entering the basement and they were hurled back to the street by the force of the explosion.

On the ground floor a group of firemen were working desperately when an avalanche of wall-paper, jarred from shelves by the explosion, came tumbling down upon them.

FIVE BURIED UNDER DEBRIS

Captain C.F. Blackwell, Howard Dyer and Roy King of Hose Company 23, William Shiller of Engine Company No.7, and J.F. Corneaugh of Truck Company 1 were buried under the debris and were immediately in danger of suffocation, their situation being all the more critical because the room was thick with smoke and gases.

A score of their comrades rushed in and dug frantically till all of them were rescued and carried out, to be hurried away to the Receiving Hospital.

Following the rescue of Chief Eley, Assistant Fire Chief O'Donnell took charge of the fight and remained on duty till all further danger had passed.

A.W. Dominguez, captain of Engine Company 14, was enjoying a day off when the alarms sounded. He made all speed to the fire and worked with his men all through the afternoon.

John B. Conlon, who recently retired as battalion chief of fireboats of the New York fire department after thirty years of service, was an interested spectator.

H.W. Broughton is president and H.C. Grupe is secretary-treasurer of the Los Angeles Wallpaper and Paint Company, which, after Brenner, is the heaviest loser in the fire.

HORSE TAKEN THROUGH FIRE

A horse hitched to a delivery wagon stood in the alley when the fire lines were closed and rather than try to get him out through the dense crowds he was unhitched and taken out to Spring street through a liquor store.

Many of the lodgers in the Hotel Brennan saved some of their effects. Motormem and conductors in uniform, a large number of who roomed there, went into the building long after it had been deserted by its dwellers and came out with grips, suitcases and trunks, drenched but happy in the rescue of their possessions.


Yes, there is a remarkable story in that photo of a horse-drawn LAFD Steamer, and the many graphics it inspired.

To learn more about the proud history of your Los Angeles Fire Department, visit the on-line LAFD historical archive or better yet, plan your family visit to the LAFD Museum in Hollywood.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Explosion Beneath Patrol Car Injures Officer

Monday, January 21, 2008 |

An LAPD Officer was injured when this manhole exploded. Click to view more...On Monday, January 21, 2008 at 2:10 PM, 3 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 28 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief Kwame Cooper, responded to a Explosion with Injury near 637 East 3rd Street in the Little Tokyo District of downtown Los Angeles.

A uniformed male Los Angeles Police Department Officer in a marked patrol unit was driving on East 3rd Street near Alameda Street when he noticed light smoke coming from a manhole cover in the roadway. The Police Officer called for routine LAFD response, and Firefighters were on scene in less than 5 minutes.

As the LAFD Engine Company arrived, the Officer drove to the Fire Department's location and parked his patrol car to block traffic - and by happenstance, parked atop a distant manhole.

Moments after he exited his patrol car to speak with Firefighters, an explosion occurred within the manhole the Officer had inadvertently parked above.

The forceful explosion - described as thunderous by witnesses, damaged the undercarriage of his Ford Crown Victoria, but there was no fire. The Officer was not struck by any debris, but did complain of back pain, for which he was taken by ambulance to an area hospital in good condition.

Third Street remained closed between Alameda and Central during the late afternoon and evening hours as the Los Angeles Police Department and Department of Water and Power investigated the cause of what appears to be a spontaneous matter within the utility agency's domain.

(video) (photos) (photos) (photos)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Fire Fatality in Early Morning Fire in the Mid City Area

|

On Monday, January 21, 2008 at 1:10 AM, 4 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, DWP, DOT and a Building & Safety Inspector, all under the direction of Battalion Chief Jose S-Cronenbold responded to a Structure Fire at 532 N. Westmoreland in the Mid-Town area.

Fire resources responded to a reported structure fire and upon arrival found a row of bungalows, one with heavy smoke and fire showing and exposing another. Fire personnel deployed handlines and began the interior attack but the extreme pack rat conditions slowed the firefighting efforts. The extreme fire load contributed to the partial roof collapse of the occupancy. The fire, which was exposing an adjacent bungalow, was contained to the original fire occupancy. The exposure suffered minor exterior damage and a small amount of fire in the attic.

A knockdown was called in only 17 minutes and the body of a male, 40, was found "hunkered" down in the corner of the structure, under piles of clothing and other possessions. The cause of the early morning fire is undetermined at this time with the preliminary dollar loss estimated at $100,000 to the structure. There were no other injuries to civilians or Firefighters.

Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

Are You a Smoker? You Need To Put it Out!

Sunday, January 20, 2008 |

Click to learn more about the Smoking and Home Fires Campaign...Smoking is the number one cause of home fire deaths. To prevent these deaths, the Los Angeles Fire Department and U.S. Fire Administration are raising awareness about home fires caused by smoking.

The Smoking & Home Fires Campaign urges smokers and those who live with them to prevent deadly fires by remembering to:

Put it Out. All the Way. Every Time!

The LAFD is proud to be an active partner in sharing this simple yet important message. Far too many people in Los Angeles have been killed in easily preventable fires that were started by cigarettes.

Most fires caused by smoking materials start on beds, furniture, or in trash - and it's not just smokers that are killed in these fires!

On average, 1,000 people are killed in smoking-related home fires every year in the USA, and most are asleep when the fires occur. Smoke-related fires can be prevented by taking a few simple precautions:
  • Smokers should smoke outside and use ashtrays with a wide, stable base that won’t tip over.
  • Always make sure cigarettes and ashes are out.
  • Never toss hot cigarette butts or ashes in the trash.
  • Soak cigarette butts and ashes in water before throwing them away.
  • Chairs and sofas burn fast so never put ashtrays on them and check for cigarettes under cushions if people have been smoking in your home.
  • If you are drowsy or falling asleep, put it out. Smoking in bed is just plain wrong.

To learn more and help spread the word, please visit:

www.usfa.dhs.gov/smoking


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Firefighters Find Body in Montecito Heights Fire

Saturday, January 19, 2008 |

On Saturday, January 19, 2008 at 2:52 AM, 5 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 1 LAFD Rescue Ambulance, 4 Arson Units and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 33 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief Dennis Waters, responded to a Fire with Civilian Fatality and Injury near 3117 Amethyst Street in Montecito Heights.

Responding to reports of a grass fire, Firefighters arrived quickly to find bystanders attempting to extinguish a hillside debris fire including the remnants of a non-mounted vehicle camper.

Upon their swift extinguishment of the blaze, Firefighters discovered the burned body of an adult male within the smoldering debris of the makeshift shelter. Without vital signs of life, the man was declared deceased at the scene.

Later, a 58 year-old companion of the decedent came forth to be treated by LAFD personnel. Suffering 2nd and 3rd degree burns to 15% of his body, with thermal injury to his head, face, back and hands, the man was transported to the Los Angeles County - USC Medical Center in serious condition.

A positive identification of the dead man, as well as the exact cause, time and manner of his death will be determined by the Coroner's office.

Pending results of the autopsy, the cause of the blaze remains the focus of a joint active investigation by Los Angeles Police and Fire Department Investigators.


Submitted by Ron Myers / Brian Humphrey, Spokesmen
Los Angeles Fire Department

Greater Alarm Fire Destroys Condos in Pacific Heights

Friday, January 18, 2008 |

On Thursday, January 17, 2008 at 8:24 PM, 15 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 5LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Urban Search and Rescue Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 4 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, DOT, Emergency Air and Rehab Tender 40, all under the direction of Assistant Chief Daniel Mc Carthy, responded to a Greater Alarm Structure Fire at 1684 N. Michael Ln. in the Pacific Heights area.

The initial report coming into the OCD Dispatch Center indicated an auto was burning in the parking structure. Once Fire Department resources arrived on scene, they found an auto, fully engulfed in flames and extending into a condominium unit located on the second floor of a three story, condominium complex. Fire resources aggressively deployed handlines and began the fire attack, while the roof team attempted diligent ventilation efforts. The persistent fire traveled up the walls and through the heater ducting in the open web roof and floor construction, spreading to two adjacent units. The occupants of the units had self evacuated.

It took 106 Firefighters two hours and fourteen minutes to contain and knock down the fire. The cause was listed as accidental, overheated brakes igniting a vehicle tire. The preliminary dollar estimate was $1.2 million dollars ( $1 million structure and $200,000 contents). The Red Cross was not needed as the displaced family relocated to an area hotel. There was no report of civilian or Firefighter injury.

(photos)

Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

Uneven Load Topples Stake Bed Truck

Thursday, January 17, 2008 |

On Thursday, January 17, 2008 at 5:56 PM, 2 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 1 LAFD Rescue Ambulance, 1 Heavy Rescue, 1 Urban Search and Rescue Unit, 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, Dozer Tender 2, Transport 2, Loader 2, Street Maintenance, DOT and LAPD, all under the direction of Battalion Chief Mark Stormes responded to a Traffic accident at 8545 W. Walnut Dr. in the Hollywood area.

Fire Department resources responded to reports of a traffic accident involving a stake bed truck. While trying to maneuver a right turn, the load in the truck, one of three loaded with approximately 5,000 to 8,000 pounds of large cuttings from eucalyptus trees, shifted. The turning maneuver caused the contents to shift, flipping the vehicle on its side and spilling the load of large logs onto the roadway.

With the aid of specialized units such as Heavy Rescue 56, Urban Search and Rescue 88 and Tractor Unit 2, the units were able to assist the on scene companies with offloading the logs, so the vehicle could be safely righted. All safety precautions were utilized in downgrading the incident to a static condition. The Driver of the truck experienced a small hematoma to the head and was treated and released at the scene. DOT was requested to divert traffic away for the duration of the incident.

Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

Firefighters Helping Firefighters Blood & Marrow Drive

|

Over the years, the Los Angeles City Fire Department has organized blood and marrow drives to save lives. In fact, just this past year, dozens of Fire Department members came out to give the "gift of life" to fellow friends and family receiving treatment at the City of Hope.

Today, we still have Firefighters receiving treatment at the City of Hope and they need your support. PLease act now. We need 50 registered participants each day - especially at this time of year when there is a blood and platelet shortage. Please take the time to give the "gift of life" by donating at the upcoming "City of Hope Blood and Marrow Drive." Friends and family are welcome.

DATE: 01/24/08

TIME: 0700 - 1300 HOURS

LOCATION: FHMTC, 1700 Stadium Way, Los Angeles

REGISTRATION CONTACT : TRACEE ELDER, CITY OF HOPE
800-535-7119, ext 65624
or email @ DONATEBLOOD@COH.ORG
626-301-8385

FOR MARROW QUESTIONS: LISA LONGORIA, CITY OF HOPE
800-535-7119, ext 63812
or email @ DONATEBLOOD@COH.ORG
626-301-8483


THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP IN GIVING THE GIFT OF LIFE


THE COMMUNITY LIAISON OFFICE

Dump Truck Strikes Home Causing Natural Gas Fed Fire

|

On Thursday, January 17, 2008 at 7:58 AM, 8 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 4 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Heavy Rescue, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Urban Search and Rescue Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, Public Works, Building & Safety Inspector, Street Maintenance, DOT, DWP, LAPD, LA CO. Health and the So. California Gas Company, all under the direction of Assistant Chief Daniel Mc Carthy, responded to a Structure Fire at 2151 Alcyona Dr. in the Hollywood area.

First arriving resources on the scene expected to find a structure fire as indicated by the multiple calls into the OCD Dispatch Center. Fire resources found an overturned dump truck into a one story single family dwelling, which had ruptured the gas line feeding the occupancy at the meter and also caused a diesel fuel spill. Early reports indicated that an elderly couple were trapped inside the occupancy. Los Angeles Fire resources were tasked with four assignments: search and rescue, fire attack, exposure protection and a Haz Mat fuel spill. Firefighters rapidly deployed handlines and attacked the structure fire, while others applied foam to the diesel fuel for precaution. The bulk of the flames were on the exterior of the structure which were gas fed by the ruptured gas line. The primary search indicated no one was trapped inside the structure. The couple was later located outside the occupancy.

The exposures sustained no damage. LAFD resources worked in concert with personnel from the gas company to shut down the severed gas line which included digging to access the line. The preliminary dollar loss estimate was $350,000 [$250,000 structure, $100,000 contents]. The only reported injury, the 40 year old driver of the dump truck, was transported to Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital with minor injuries. LA Co. Health monitored the diesel fuel clean up. Building and Safety was requested to inspect the structural integrity of the home. The couple declined assistance from the Red Cross electing to stay with friends.


(video) (video)


Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

Major Emergency Fire in the Miracle Mile District

Tuesday, January 15, 2008 |

On Tuesday, January 15, 2008 at 2:21 PM, 23 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 6 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 2 Arson Units, 2 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 7 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, Emergency Air 1 & 2, Rehab Tender 40, 2 CERT Team Coordinators, Street Maintenance, DOT and DWP, all under the direction of Deputy Chief Mario Rueda, responded to a Report of Smoke at 5449 W. 6th St. in the Miracle Mile District.

Multiple calls flooded into the OCD Dispatch Center confirming an active fire. Units arriving first on the scene found a two story, "U" shaped apartment building with smoke and fire showing from the attic vents. An urgent request for additional resources was made. Many of the occupants responded and reacted to smoke alarm activations and self evacuated the building. Companies assigned to fire attack while deploying their hoselines, found the attic fully engulfed in flames and exposing the adjacent two story apartment buildings on the "B" and "D" sides of the fire occupancy. Ventilation crews were ordered to perform a "strip or trench" ventilation operation to prevent the spread of fire to the uninvolved portions of the building. There was a 30 to 40 percent loss to the roof of the structure. Companies assigned exposure protection precluded any damage to those occupancies.

It took 159 Firefighters and specialty companies to extinguish the afternoon blaze. The cause was determined to be workers sweating pipe in the attic space. The preliminary dollar loss is estimated at over $1 million to the structure and the contents is undetermined at this time. There were no reports of injury to civilians or Firefighters, which could greatly be attributed to functional smoke alarms and early self evacuation. The Red Cross is on the scene assisting the 15 individuals displaced with their housing needs. La Brea Avenue and Detroit Street were closed in both directions between 6th Street and Wilshire Boulevard. They will remain closed until further notice.

(video) (video)

Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Video: Are You Ready To Get Things Done?

Monday, January 14, 2008 |

If you've always harnessed the passion for an unconventional and rewarding career with unparalleled opportunity, we hope you'll consider the Los Angeles Fire Department as your life's work.

LAFD - Gettin' Things Done:


To learn more about your career as a Los Angeles Firefighter, call (213)485-8032 or visit:

joinLAFD.org


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Kids to 'Move Their Tails' for Los Angeles Firefighters

Sunday, January 13, 2008 |

The 'Move Your Tail' Challenge. Click to learn more...The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department cordially invite you and your family to join them on Saturday January 26th, 2008 at the beautiful Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California for the:

'Move Your Tail'
Kids Fitness Challenge 5K Walk/Run


Entry is free for this fun event, which promotes healthy activity and life safety for children, while encouraging support for the Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemen's Fund through sponsorships and prizes.

Wilshire The Fire Dog. Click to learn more...Among the reasons for your family to attend 'Move Your Tail' will be an opportunity to meet and greet Wilshire The Fire Dog, the amazing LAFD Dalmatian and television star who imparts fun and memorable lessons of fire safety and emergency preparedness with children of all ages.

Wilshire's parallel mission of helping children lead healthy lives was a prime inspiration for the 'Move Your Tail' Challenge, and one of the key reasons we want you to meet him at this special event.

Additionally, Wilshire and Firefighter Ryan Penrod will underscore the importance of responsible animal stewardship, as they encourage children to follow the core values of trust, courage, and honesty.

Please don't forget your camera on Saturday January 26th, 2008 from 7:00 AM to 12 Noon. Kindly meet us at Wilshire's booth by 7:45 AM as the race starts at 8:00 AM!

For additional information, participant registration or an event flyer, please call Marlene Casillas at (213) 480-4317 or visit:

www.lafra.org


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Family Rescued from East L.A. Freeway Inferno

Saturday, January 12, 2008 |

Thumbnail image courtesy of Callie Miller at LAist.com. Click to view more...On Saturday, January 12, 2008 at 10:06 AM, 10 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 1 LAFD Foam Tender, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, 2 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 66 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel, as well as 1 Company of Los Angeles County Firefighters and 1 Company of Vernon Firefighters, all under the direction of LAFD Battalion Chief John Biggs, responded to a Traffic Collision with Fire on the Southbound Golden State (5) Fwy south of 4th Street in Boyle Heights.

A family had been traveling in a two vehicle caravan through the East Los Angeles interchange, when another vehicle reportedly collided with a big rig, forcing it to take evasive action or lose control and partially crushing a sedan beneath its cargo trailer.

It is believed that a 'saddle tank' of diesel fuel for the tractor-trailer combination may have been pierced, damaged or dislodged in the primary or secondary collision, spilling a sizeable but unknown quantity of the combustible fuel on the highway.

Witnessing the sedan became trapped beneath the cargo trailer in their rear view mirror, relatives abruptly stopped their vehicle and ran to the aid of the three trapped family members as fire erupted. According to bystanders, a male relative guided the adult female driver and 9 year-old girl in exiting the crumpled wreckage, before rescuing an adult male from the rear of the car by breaking a window.

Firefighters arrived soon thereafter to find the mangled sedan and 53' foot cargo trailer full of used tires ablaze, and immediately attacked the well-entrenched flames, as California Highway Patrol Officers closed all lanes of travel.

Drawing strongly from LAFD operational planning and interagency drills, Firefighters were able to promptly supplement the limited water supply on the freeway by using an aerial ladder truck to hoist a pair of hydrant supply lines from the street level below the interchange.

Armed quickly with the high volume of water and foam necessary to battle the stubborn fire, Firefighters were able to extinguish the flames in just 32 minutes.

The tools, teamwork and technology of an LAFD Hazardous Materials Squad were put to use early by the Incident Commander to predict the path of water runoff and preclude or limit impact to adjacent properties.

The three occupants of the sedan were taken to White Memorial Hospital for further evaluation of minor complaints. No other injuries were reported.

Firefighters remained on scene to assist the California Highway Patrol, Caltrans and Los Angeles County Fire Department Health Hazardous Materials Division in their challenging investigation and resolution of the incident, for which one or more lanes of travel remained closed until 8:00 PM, effecting multiple southland freeways.


(video) (photos)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

88 Years Ago: The Shrine Auditorium Fire

Friday, January 11, 2008 |

To describe the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles as well known would be an understatement. Home to globally televised awards shows, concerts, theater productions, movie screenings, conventions and conferences, a fire at this landmark facility nearly killed six Los Angeles Firefighters on January 11, 1920 in a three-alarm blaze that destroyed the building in 30 minutes.

Shrine Auditorium Fire in Los Angeles, January 11, 1920. Click to enlarge...

Throughout the six year rebuilding effort following that fire, and again in a major remodeling in 2002, the Los Angeles Fire Department played a key role in the development of the Moroccan-theme marvel, which has hosted the Academy Awards, Grammy Awards, MTV Video Music Awards, BET Awards, Emmy Awards, People's Choice Awards, American Music Awards, the NAACP Image Awards and many others.

Like other theaters and public assemblage sites in our City, you'll often find an LAFD Inspector making his or her rounds, assuring that those in the spotlight and all who applaud them remain safe.

Whether you're receiving an Oscar® or merely enjoying the nightlife of Los Angeles, we hope you'll take solace in knowing that Inspectors from the LAFD Bureau of Fire Prevention and Public Safety are working hard behind the scenes - and often on-site, to assure your well being.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Woman Dies, Man Injured in Pre-Dawn L.A. Blaze

Thursday, January 10, 2008 |

On Thursday, January 10, 2008 at 5:19 AM, 16 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 6 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 4 Arson Units, 1 Urban Search and Rescue Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 3 Helicopters, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 3 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 120 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel, responded to a Major Emergency Structure Fire in a Residential Highrise at 947 South Hoover Street in the Westlake/MacArthur Park area.

Firefighters arrived quickly to discover an eight story residential highrise building for seniors with reports of one person trapped by fire in a first floor apartment.

A passerby in the interior hallway had noticed smoke from the doorway of the involved unit, and promptly notified building staff and the Fire Department.

The attempt of an adult male staff member to enter the burning apartment prior to the Fire Department's arrival proved fruitless, as he was driven back by intense heat and smoke that ultimately sent him to the hospital.

Teams of Firefighters swiftly established a formal presence on the 1st through 8th floors to shelter occupants in place and manage smoke while their colleagues confined the flames to the apartment of fire origin, extinguishing the blaze in just 28 minutes.

During an aggressive and well-coordinated fire attack, Firefighters found and removed the lifeless body of a 71 year-old female from the smoke- and flame-filled apartment. Having suffered burn injury and without vital signs of life, she proved beyond medical assistance and was declared deceased at the scene.

The male staff member earlier attempting the rescue, was transported in fair condition to California Hospital Medical Center for treatment of smoke exposure.

No other injuries were reported.

Firefighters determined Smoke Alarms were present in the unit of fire origin, but their functional status at the time of the blaze could not be immediately determined.

Though there was considerable storage of personal goods within the apartment, no obvious factors impairing egress were identified.

The building was not equipped with fire sprinklers.

Monetary loss to the Salvation Army Silvercrest Senior Residence is still being tabulated.

A positive identification of the deceased woman, as well as the exact cause, time and manner of her death will be determined by the Coroner's Office.

The cause of this pre-dawn blaze has been categorized as accidental and determined to be electrical in nature.

(video)


Submitted by David Ortiz/Brian Humphrey, Spokesmen
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Mourns Entertainer, Commissioner, Friend...

|

Fire Commissioner and Honorary Fire Chief Johnny Grant. Click to learn more...The Los Angeles Fire Department mourns the passing of Mr. Johnny Grant, a former Fire Commissioner and Honorary Fire Chief for the City of Los Angeles, whose work in and involving our community gained him the love and respect of generations of Los Angeles Firefighters and their families.

A globally renowned ambassador of both our City and the entertainment industry, he was known by many as the 'Honorary Mayor of Hollywood' for his decades of vital work in the film, radio, television and tourism industries.

Mr. Grant's unwavering support of the LAFD was only overshadowed by his passion of assisting the men and women of our Armed Forces, exemplified by his 15 trips to Korea and 14 tours to combat bases throughout Vietnam... in all, a monumental 55 USO and personally-organized visits to our troops overseas.

Confirmed as a member of the Los Angeles Fire Commission on April 19, 1967 and later serving as Commission President, Mr. Grant provided oversight of the LAFD through Chief Engineer Raymond Hill during a period of immense operational growth and challenge.

The Los Angeles Fire Department Paramedics he championed were called to his suite at the legendary Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood on January 9, 2008 to confirm his passing.

Fire Chief Douglas Barry and members of the LAFD extend their heartfelt condolence to Mr. Grant's family and friends worldwide, who were touched by his sincerity, dedication and integrity.

The Stars on Hollywood Boulevard will shine, albeit less brightly, as we mourn the loss of our great friend, Mr. Johnny Grant.

(video) (video) (video) (video) (video)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

FireRescue1: Meet the Chief, Douglas Barry

Wednesday, January 09, 2008 |

Your LAFD Media and Public Relations staff expend great effort each day meeting the needs of niche media across the globe, including such well-regarded fire service websites as FireRescue1.

Recently, it was our pleasure to arrange for FireRescue1's Jamie Thompson to visit with Los Angeles Fire Chief Douglas Barry...

Meet the Chief: Douglas Barry, Los Angeles Fire Department
By Jamie Thompson
FireRescue1 News Editor

"There were likely few less desirable jobs in the fire industry than that of Los Angeles Fire Department Chief just over 12 months ago.

The LAFD had been subjected to a string of lawsuits alleging sexual and racial harassment, and union relations were seriously strained. The turmoil crested in December 2006 when then-Chief William Bamattre resigned amid a furor over a black firefighter, Tennie Pierce, being served spaghetti mixed with dog food.

Fortunately for the LAFD, Bamattre's replacement, Douglas Barry, has helped to steady the ship — even if he was initially reluctant to take on the job.

Barry was a 31-year veteran of the LAFD, having served as firefighter, engineer, captain, battalion chief, chief of staff and assistant chief. The chief's position seemed the logical next step, but at the time of Bamattre's resignation... (more...)"


The full article and your comments at the FireRescue1 website...


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

2 Dead, 1 Injured in Fiery Harbor Freeway Collision

|

On Wednesday, January 9, 2008 at 1:56 AM, 5 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 3 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Heavy Rescue, 1 EMS Battalion Captain and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 36 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief Curt Klafta, responded to a Civilian Fatality Traffic Collision with Fire on the Northbound Harbor (110) Freeway north of Century Boulevard in South Los Angeles.

Firefighters arrived quickly to discover a three vehicle collision with one vehicle ablaze, and flames threatening others as debris blocked multiple lanes of travel.

Despite the LAFD's quick response and fire extinguishment, the two occupants of a burning mid-size coupe, believed to be a man and a woman, proved beyond their help. They were declared deceased at the scene.

The male driver of a full-size sport utility vehicle was taken by ambulance to California Hospital Medical Center for treatment of minor non-thermal injuries, while another male who had been operating a small minivan declined treatment and transportation.

No other injuries were reported.

Firefighters remained at the scene more than an hour supporting the California Highway Patrol's collision investigation, as well as the Coroner's discrete and dignified removal of the deceased from the wreckage.

A positive identification of those who died, as well as the precise cause, time and manner of their deaths will be determined by the Coroner's office.

(video)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

L.A. Firefighters Discover Body in Burning Car

Tuesday, January 08, 2008 |

On Tuesday, January 8, 2008 at 9:44 PM, 3 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters and 2 Arson Units responded to a Vehicle Fire With Civilian Fatality near 936 West 73rd Street in South Los Angeles.

Firefighters called to battle a compact coupe ablaze in an alley, discovered the remains of one person within the vehicle as they extinguished the flames.

Los Angeles Fire Department Arson Investigators have been joined by Police officials in what remains an active joint investigation.

A positive identification of the deceased, as well as the precise cause, time and manner of their death will be determined by the Coroner's office.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

North Hollywood "Bank Heist" Restaurant Fire Injures Five Firefighters

Monday, January 07, 2008 |

On Monday, January 7, 2008 at 7:13 AM, 28 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 10LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 2 Arson Units, 3 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 1 Rehab Unit, Emergency Air, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 4 EMS Battalion Captains, 4 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, all under the direction of Assistant Chief Timothy Manning responded to a Major Emergency Structure Fire at 5303 N. Lankershim Bl. in North Hollywood.

Firefighters arrived on scene to find an older, two-story commercial building, with moderate smoke showing. Firefighters entered the structure attempting to locate the fire, while fellow Firefighters began ventilation operations on the roof. The building, a former bank built in 1926, had recently been remodeled and was doing business as the "Bank Heist" restaurant and night club.

Ventilation efforts were extremely difficult and time consuming due to the Spanish roof tile covering nearly a dozen layers of composition roofing material covering a thick layer of insulation foam, all laid on top of the wood sheathing. Due to the extended time required to ventilate the building, Firefighters inside the structure had to endure extremely hot and smoky conditions for an extended period of time.

Approximately 40 minutes into the fire fight and after several incidents of Firefighters activating emergency radio triggers or being injured, the decision was made to withdraw all personnel from the interior and roof of the building. A defensive exterior attack was initiated until the stability of the structure could be assessed and all members had been accounted for.

Eighteen minutes later, after the structural integrity was determined safe, Firefighters resumed offensive actions to control and extinguish the blaze. In all, 200 Firefighters worked for over two hours to gain control of this fire and prevent the total destruction of the historic building.

The former bank building suffered significant damage. The roof and second floor suffered heavy fire damage, the first floor and basement experienced minimal fire damage, however, did experience water damage. During this fire, five Firefighters suffered minor injuries and / or smoke inhalation requiring transport to a local hospital for evaluation. Three of the injured Firefighters were returned to duty and two were placed off duty to recuperate from home.

One civilian did suffer non-life threatening injuries and was transported to Providence St. Joseph's Hospital for medical care. The cause of this fire remains under investigation and the dollar loss is still being tabulated.

Video Pictures

Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Silver Lake Greater Alarm Fire Displaces 14

|

On Monday, January 7, 2008 at 4:22 AM, 14 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 6 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 2 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 3 EMS Battalion Captains, 4 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, CHP, DOT, Emergency Air 2, and members of the Housing Department under the direction of Battalion Chief Kwame Cooper responded to a Greater Alarm Structure Fire at 1149 N. West Kensington Rd. in Silver Lake.

First arriving companies on the scene found a complex of three, two story, wood sided duplexes in an inverted "C" formation. The duplex located in the center of the formation was showing fire and smoke from one unit on the second floor. With the close proximity of the other two duplex exposures, a call for additional companies was initiated immediately. The bulk of the fire was confined to the original fire building, with fire extending into the attic of the structure. The two exposures, suffered minor singeing and a small amount of fire into the walls.

It took 104 firefighters committed to the firefight tio knock the fire down in 53 minutes. One civilian male, 28, was transported to County USC Hospital with smoke inhalation. Two other civilians were treated and released at the scene. The Red Cross was notified to assist 10 adults and 4 children with their housing needs. A request was made to CHP to shut down the freeway off-ramp from the Northbound 101 at Bellevue for the duration of the incident.

The cause is under investigation. The dollar loss estimate at: $375,000 total
Main Structure - $250,000 Structure and $50,000 Contents
Two Adjacent Units - $25,000 Structure and $50,000 Contents


Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

Hiker Rescued After Falling From Hiking Trail

Wednesday, January 02, 2008 |

On Wednesday, January 2, 2008 at 5;46 PM, 4 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighers, 1 LAFD Rescue Ambulance, 2 Helicopters and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, all under the direction of Battalion Chief Graham Everett, responded to a Rescue at 901 N. Temescal Canyon Rd. in the Pacific Palisades area.

Fire resources responded to a call to assist a person that had fallen and had landed in a tree. What fire resources did not know was that a 59 year old male hiker had fallen from the Temescal Canyon hiking trail, tumbling downward approximately thirty feet before landing precariously at the base of a large tree which stopped his descent into the deep, heavy brush covered ravine approximately 150 feet below. With the use of his cell phone, he was able to aid in his rescue by communicating his position to the OCD Dispatch Center. Within the hour, the hiker was finally located with the assistance of two helicopters and four ground companies.

Utilizing a two-line, belay rope system, fire personnel were lowered to the hiker with the Stokes Litter Basket in tow. Once the rescuers reached the hiker, he was stabilized and hoisted in the litter basket to the site if an awaiting ambulance. The hiker was transported to an area hospital in stable condition with a minor ankle injury.

The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department would like to remind you of a few trail safety when hiking:

1. Hike with someone or let someone where you will be hiking.
2. Take a cell phone, first aid kit and water. (Cell phone coverage in
the mountains is spotty).
3. Stay alert of your surroundings
4. Take medications with you on long hikes.
5. Avoid unfamiliar areas when hiking alone.


Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department