Garth Brooks 'Fire Relief Concert' in Los Angeles

Thursday, November 29, 2007 |

The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department hope you will join them on January 26, 2008, when legendary performer Garth Brooks appears at the Staples Center in Los Angeles to support recent wildfire victims in Southern California.

Tickets for this fundraising event will only be available through Ticketmaster. The Los Angeles Fire Department is not involved with ticket sales or distribution. More information below...

"LOS ANGELES, Nov. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- Having been approached by California state elected officials as well as civic leaders from areas affected by recent wildfires, music superstar Garth Brooks has agreed to perform a benefit concert to raise money for the recent fire victims and for the future of fire fighting in the state of California.

Tickets for the January 26, 2008 9:00 PM benefit concert at Los Angeles' STAPLES Center starring Brooks will be available this Saturday, December 1 at 9:00 AM.

Tickets priced at $38.60 (plus 1.40 city amusement tax and $5.00 handling charge) for all seats will be available via Ticketmaster charge-by-phone network and on-line at www.ticketmaster.com

Tickets will not be available at the STAPLES Center Box Office or other outlets. There will be a limit of... (more...)"


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

L.A. Firefighters Limit Damage in Fashion District Blaze

Wednesday, November 28, 2007 |

On Wednesday, November 28, 2007 at 1:11 PM, 14 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 6 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 3 EMS Battalion Captains, 3 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 98 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel joined by 1 civilian CERT Coordinator, all under the direction of Assistant Chief Daniel McCarthy responded to a Greater Alarm Structure Fire at 1031 South Santee Street in the Fashion District of Los Angeles.

Scrambling for the Next Call. © Photo by Eric Richardson. Click to enlarge... Scrambling for the Next Call. © Photo by Eric Richardson. Click to enlarge...

Firefighters scrambled from an earlier fire in a nearby high-rise residential building to discover smoke showing from the rooftop of a 75' x 100' two-story commercial structure.

As aerial ladders were swiftly extended to the arched truss roof, Firefighters deployed multiple hoselines through first floor retail space and second floor garment manufacturing to do battle with fierce fire in a vast attic that ran the length and breadth of the building.

Aided greatly by their coworkers skillful and timely use of chainsaws to perform vertical ventilation, Firefighters were able to limit fire spread, confining the flames to the attic and extinguishing fire in just 24 minutes.

There were no injuries.

Fire loss is estimated at $80,000 ($50,000 structure & $30,000 contents). The cause of this early afternoon blaze is categorized as electrical.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Images courtesy of Eric Richardson

Explosion Rocks Chatsworth Cosmetic Firm

Monday, November 26, 2007 |

On Monday, November 26, 2007 at 12:03 PM, 14 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 11 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Rehab Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Task Force and HazMat Tender, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 2 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 107 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Assistant Chief Greg West, responded to a Explosion with Civilian Injury at 9171 Oso Avenue in Chatsworth.

Firefighters arrived quickly in an industrial neighborhood to discover no external evidence of explosion, but light smoke showing from a one-story laboratory annex attached to a 200' x 200' two-story cosmetics firm.

Learning that the explosion caused injury within the Research and Development Lab of 'Thibiant International', Firefighters remained upwind while directing and cordoning employees who had calmly evacuated the effected space and structures to the north.

Following strict LAFD protocol that enhanced situational awareness and caution for a possible secondary explosion, Firefighters donned protective gear and radiation sensing devices as they established hot, warm and cold zones for any necessary decontamination.

As perimeter and traffic control were established by Police and Department of Transportation officials, Firefighters furthered their scene assessment and stabilization efforts to determine that there was no active fire, radiation or external hazard.

Only four of the nearly 275 building occupants proved desirous of medical attention. The four workers, including one woman with minor facial burns, and three males complaining solely of transient shortness of breath, were promptly triaged and treated on site.

With no escalating danger to the neighborhood identified, and after consulting with chemists from the firm, LAFD Hazardous Materials experts donned special protective suits to enter the laboratory. Using sophisticated sensing equipment, they determined the sole presence of an organic peroxide, common to the business, as having been involved in the explosion and flash fire.

Without a need for decontamination, the four injured workers were soon transported to area hospitals in good condition, and no other injuries were reported.

The monetary impact of blast damage within the lab was not determined by Fire Department officials. The explosion is categorized as an industrial accident, and attributed to the detonation of organic peroxide in contact with a heating plate used for mixing operations.

The Health Hazardous Materials Division of the Los Angeles County Fire Department was summoned to handle the incident to conclusion.

(video)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Firefighters Rescue Pair From Burning Sun Valley Home

Sunday, November 25, 2007 |

On Sunday, November 25, 2007 at 2:46 AM, 6 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 3 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 EMS Battalion Captain and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 39 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief Dan McCarty, responded to a Structure Fire with Civilian Injuries at 8617 Lehigh Avenue in Sun Valley.

Firefighters arrived quickly to discover heavy fire within a one-story single family home, and reports of persons trapped in the blaze.

A swift and well-coordinated primary search of the 1,253 square-foot home was conducted simultaneous to fire attack, and Firefighters soon emerged with a 4 year-old male who had suffered burns to the forehead, ear and both hands.

In their continuing search of the smoke-charged building, Firefighters discovered a 35 year-old male collapsed on a bed. Disoriented and suffering from severe smoke inhalation, he was briskly assisted from the home to the care of awaiting LAFD Paramedics.

The boy was taken to Pacifica Hospital of the Valley, while his father went to Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, both in serious condition.

Six family members had been sleeping in the 3 bedroom home when the fire erupted. First to note the flames was a preteen female, who immediately called 9-1-1 to report the fire before she escaped.

Other family members were subsequently awakened by the distant screams of the injured 4 year-old boy, who had been with his sibling 9-1-1 caller, but remained in or near the room of fire origin.

Though able to escape with his wife, infant child and a preteen male from a bedroom at the rear of the home, the father was apparenty attempting to aid the trapped 4 year-old when he was overcome by the intense heat and smoke of the fire.

The fire was confined to the bedroom of fire origin and adjacent hallway, and extinguished in just 20 minutes.

No other injuries were reported.

It is important to note that Firefighters found no evidence of functional smoke alarms within the residence. There were no obvious physical factors impairing egress, and the 60 year-old home was not equipped with fire sprinklers.

Monetary loss from the fire is estimated at $80,000 ($50,000 structure & $30,000 contents).

The cause of this nearly-lethal blaze is a common culprit this time of year: an electric space heater in the children's room that toppled, igniting carpeting and bedding.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Reseda Man Severely Burned in Garage Fire

Saturday, November 24, 2007 |

On Saturday, November 24, 2007 at 8:09 PM, 5 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 EMS Battalion Captain and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 33 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief James Gaffney, responded to a Structure Fire with Civilian Burn Injury at 18571 Cantara Street in Reseda.

Firefighters responded quickly to find the attached garage of a one-story single family home well involved with fire, with flames threatening the adjoining home and attic.

As Firefighters extended handlines to do battle with the flames, their colleagues came to the immediate aid of a severely burned adult male standing on the front lawn.

According to the man, he had been performing motorcycle repair within his garage, when he was suddenly enveloped in flames. Running into the home, he was ushered to the front lawn by his wife, who helped to fully extinguish his burning skin and clothes.

As Paramedic-trained Firefighters provided prompt medical care, other Firefighters took to the roof to perform precise and timely vertical ventilation, limiting horizontal fire spread and allowing the flames to be fully controlled in less than 18 minutes.

The injured man was taken to nearby Northridge Hospital Medical Center in critical condition with 2nd degree burns to more than a third of his body.

Monetary loss from the fire is estimated at $325,000 ($250,000 structure & $75,000 contents). The cause of the blaze is listed as accidental, and attributed to gasoline fumes coming into contact with a water heater pilot light.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Firefighters Battle High Rise Blaze Near LAX

Friday, November 23, 2007 |

On Friday, November 23, 2007 at 8:04 PM, 22 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 5 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Rehab Unit, 1 CERT Coordinator, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 3 Helicopters, 4 EMS Battalion Captains, 4 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team all under the direction of Assistant Chief Donald Austin responded to a High-rise Fire at 5757 West Century Boulevard near Los Angeles International Airport's 'Hotel Row'.

First arriving Firefighters arrived to find an 8-story high-rise office building with reports of smoke on the sixth floor. An assessment of the alarm panel in the lobby area showed several smoke alarms activated on the sixth and seventh floors.

Firefighters, carrying hosepacks, breathing apparatus, and dressed in full turnouts ascended the stairway to the sixth floor. Upon arrival, Fire companies reported heavy smoke in the 150' long hallway and yet, they were unable to locate the fire.

Utilizing the High-rise Incident Command System, additional Firefighters evaluated the floors above and below the reported fire floor. As additional Firefighters assisted with fire attack, the fire was located inside one suite on the sixth floor.

Hoselines were connected to the stairwell standpipes, extended down the hallway, and into the suite, enabling Firefighters to extinguish the fire in just under one hour. Firefighters spent several hours after the fire was extinguished protecting other occupancies in the building from water and smoke damage. It took 150 Firefighters to locate and extinguish the fire.

There were no injuries reported.

The cause is under investigation and dollar loss is still being tabulated.


Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Malfunctioning Fireplace Damages Valley Village Home

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On Friday, November 23, 2007 at 6:29 PM, 13 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 4 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Urban Search and Rescue Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 3 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, under the direction of Battalion Chief Richard Markota responded to a Greater Alarm Structure Fire at 4833 Morella Avenue in Valley Village.

Firefighters arrived to find a 4800 square foot, 2 and 3 story single-family home with smoke showing from the roof area.

Firefighters entered the home in an effort to locate and extinguish the fire. The fire, which had originated in the wall near the fireplace, was running within the walls and had extended into the area between floors and made it's way into the attic area.

It took 90 Firefighters just under an hour to locate the fire, dismantle the walls, pull ceilings, and conduct roof ventilation in an effort to extinguish the fire and prevent the total destruction of the family's home.

There were no injuries reported at this fire.

The dollar loss is estimated to be $150,000 ($120,000 structure and $30,000 contents). The cause of the fire appears to be a malfunctioning fireplace.


Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Thanks to You: A Murderer Remains Behind Bars

Thursday, November 22, 2007 |

Earlier this year, I shared a deeply personal request for each of you to consider the pending parole of California inmate Mario Catanio, the man who murdered Los Angeles Firefighter Tom Taylor.

On January 28, 1981, we tragically lost Apparatus Operator Taylor and nearly eight other Firefighters as they battled the fire Catanio set at Cugee’s Restaurant in North Hollywood. Catanio eventually stood trial, and was justly convicted of murder, arson and fraud in the conspiracy to burn down the financially ailing restaurant.

Despite the outrage of Firefighters past and present, not a single mainstream news outlet thought the parole hearing to be worthy of sharing.

You however, felt - and acted, quite differently.

As a result of the earlier blog post, hundreds of you put ink to paper and shared your personal thoughts about this widow- and orphan-maker being loose on our streets.

Your correspondence to the Parole Board made it perfectly clear that those who murder Firefighters will not be allowed to slip from memory. Nor will their evil likes be allowed to sneak silently into our neighborhoods without the voices of the vulnerable being heard.

Thanks to you, Inmate Catanio's parole was denied.

More importantly however, both Firefighters and those they proudly serve can feel safer, knowing that one less murderer is walking the streets of Los Angeles.

The words seem far too simple, but let us please say: Thank You!


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Thanksgiving Day Event Interrupted With Smell of Smoke

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On Thursday, November 22, 2007 at 5:43 PM, 12 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Urban Search and Rescue Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 2 Helicopters, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, 3 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, all under the direction of Assistant Chief Tim Manning, responded to a Greater Alarm Structure Fire at 2727 N. Benedict Canyon Dr., in the Benedict Canyon area.

The initial size-up for the large, three story, 11,000 square foot stone dwelling, was light smoke coming from the area around the fireplace. Further investigation found a small amount of fire in the walls around the fireplace and medium amounts of smoke on the second floor. An immediate call for additional resources was requested with helicopters, to recon the heavy brush surrounding the dwelling's compound. DOT was requested to shut down Benedict Canyon Road in both directions for access of fire apparatus for the duration of the incident.

The fire proved to be a viable adversary, creeping stealthily upward within the walls. 87 Firefighters put forth an assertive effort, utilizing handlines and specialized tools for 1 hour and 38 minutes before finally calling for a knockdown. The fire was contained between the walls and the firebox. No injuries were reported. The dollar loss was was estimated at $155,000 [$150,000 to the structure and $5,000 for the contents]. A Thanksgiving event was being held in the large occupancy. All occupants were evacuated and no injuries reported.

Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

Pair to Stand Trial For Attempted Murder and Arson

Monday, November 19, 2007 |

Herbert Riley 60, and Patricia Wilson 38, have been ordered to stand trial in Los Angeles Superior Court for attempted murder and arson.

On September 30, 2007, Officers from the LAPD Newton Division along with LAFD Arson Investigators arrested the couple after their dispute with two occupants of a dwelling located at 625 East 21st Street in Los Angeles.

After making threats to burn the house, Riley returned to distribute and ignite gasoline on the porch occupied by two of the residents. The fire caused minor burns to one of the victim's legs.

In addition to the attempt murder and arson charge, Riley was held to answer on assault and criminal threats.

Bail remained in excess of $2 Million for both defendants.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Three Canines Succumb in Highland Park Blaze

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On Monday, November 19, 2007 at 10:07 AM, 13 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 4 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 2 Arson Units, 3 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 3 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 101 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Acting Battalion Commander Edward Holguin responded to a Greater Alarm Structure Fire at 5722 East Benner Street in Highland Park.

Firefighters arrived quickly to find a 1,008 square-foot one-story single family home well involved, with flames threatening an outbuilding to the south.

According to witnesses, an adult female was showering when informed by a 4 year-old child that there was a fire in the house. The two, along with an adult male and older female were able to evacuate unscathed.

Firefighters swiftly forced entry into the burning home, and using handlines, mounted an aggressive and well-coordinated attack on the blaze. With timely and effective vertical ventilation aiding their ability to remain within the heat and smoke-charged structure, Firefighters rescued one Chihuahua from the ink-black darkness, soon placing the minimally injured pet in the arms of the grateful residents.

Firefighters confined the intense flames to a centrally located bedroom and hallway, extinguishing the fire in just 18 minutes.

No human injuries were reported.

While overhauling the fire, Firefighters discovered three Chihuahuas underneath a bed. Without vital signs of life, the diminutive dogs were declared deceased at the scene.

It is important to note that Firefighters found no evidence of functional smoke alarms in the home, as required by law. The eight persons displaced by the blaze chose to seek their own accommodation.

Fire loss to the 84 year-old home is estimated at $100,000 ($75,000 structure & $25,000 contents). The cause of the blaze remains under investigation.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Billboard Praise For Firefighters

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Billboard near LAX. Image courtesy of The Gerli Life. Click to enlarge...The Los Angeles Fire Department would like to thank CBS Outdoor and KRTH-FM for their humbling tribute to all who battled recent wildfires in Southern California.

It is indeed our honor to serve in times of duress, and we remain grateful for the unswerving community support of our team and its mission.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Image of billboard near LAX courtesy of The Gerli Life.

LAFD Retiree Fred Nuesca: 'Original Condition'

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Video from Ventura County Star. Click to view...
Chances are you have admired the work of Fred Nuesca. If not for his valorous 32 years as a Los Angeles Firefighter, then likely the passion he has quietly pursued since retirement: the restoration of antique machines you've seen on television, in the movies and in Las Vegas.

From his house in Newbury Park, Fred Nuesca charms life back into old pieces of what would otherwise be junk.

Cash registers, clocks, slot machines, an old dentist's chair — you name it, Nuesca has fixed, cleaned, polished and refurbished it.

"I like taking things that have served in a business or something and then were replaced by the newer things and set aside and forgotten," he said. "I like to take them and bring them back to... (more...)"


We encourage you to read the story and watch the video of one of LAFD's most beloved retirees, whose skillful hands, respect for the past, devotion to detail and Will Rogers-like persona, have guided and inspired generations of Firefighters.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Working Smoke Detectors Save Residents in Early Morning Fire

Sunday, November 18, 2007 |

On Sunday, November 18, 2007 at 4:11 AM, 4 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, all under the direction of Battalion Chief Patrick Butler, responded to a Structure Fire at 1856 S. Kelton Av. in the Westwood area.

The first arriving Fire Department resources reported heavy smoke coming from the top floor of a 2 story duplex. Further investigation found one room on the second floor fully involved. It took 27 firefighters and an aggressive attack on the fire to get a knockdown called in 11 minutes. After a search of the occupancy, the residents, a brother and sister, were located outside the structure.

The brother was able to self evacuate because of working smoke detectors. Upon learning his sister was still inside, the brother tried to rescue her but was overcome by heavy smoke and flames. The sister, also alerted by the smoke alarm and neighbors, utilizing quick wit was able to assist in her own rescue by shutting the door to her bedroom and jumping from the second floor window. She sustained no injuries. The brother was transported to UCLA Hospital for smoke inhalation.

The cause of the early morning fire was due to the wall heater. Extensive damage to the hallway and bedroom was estimated at $87,000 ($75,000 structure and $12,000 contents). There were no other reported injuries. The residents of the duplex surviving the early morning blaze can be attributed to working smoke alarms.

The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department want to remind you that now is the time to prepare for the upcoming change in season. The Change Your Clock Change Your Battery campaign in conjunction with Daylight Savings Time, emphasizes the importance of testing smoke alarms monthly, changing the batteries once a year and having an escape plan in case of a fire. Have your fireplace and/or heater thoroughly inspected prior to the 1st use of the season by a qualified professional.

Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

Man Dies in Eagle Rock Residential Fire

Saturday, November 17, 2007 |

On Friday, November 16, 2007 at 6:19 AM, 17 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 6 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 8 Arson Units, 2 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 3 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, and 1 CERT Coordinator all under the direction of Battalion Chief Chris Logan responded to a Major Emergency Structure Fire at 1977 N. Nolden St. in Eagle Rock.

First arriving Firefighters discovered a two-story single-family home well involved in fire and an adjacent single-family home with fire showing. The fire, located in an area of heavy vegetation had began to extend into the surrounding brush, threatening additional structures. In addition to the heavy volume of fire, Firefighters were receiving reports of two people that were unaccounted for and possibly trapped inside one of the structures.

Firefighting efforts were concentrated on preventing the spread of the fire into adjacent homes and containing the fire to the structures already involved. As these efforts progressed, search and rescue operations were simultaneously conducted in an effort to locate the individuals who were unaccounted for.
After the fire was extinguished, an eighty-four year-old male was discovered inside the gutted home and declared dead at the scene.

The Los Angeles County Coroner's office, using a cadaver dog, assisted in searching the structure for the second person reported missing. Fortunately, after a thorough search, the individual returned to the scene and was accounted for unharmed. The cause of the fire and the circumstances surrounding the fatality are under investigation. The dollar loss is still being tabulated. One home was destroyed, one home suffered extensive damage, and on outbuilding was damaged.

Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Video: 'Attack' Your Career Aspirations

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If you've always harnessed the passion for an unconventional and rewarding career with unparalleled opportunity, we hope you'll consider the Los Angeles Fire Department as your life's work.

LAFD - 'Attack' Your Career Aspirations:


To learn more about your career as a Los Angeles Firefighter, call (213)485-8032 or visit:

joinLAFD.org


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Fire Consumes Hyde Park Furniture Factory

Thursday, November 15, 2007 |

On Thursday, November 15, 2007 at 4:45 PM, 19 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 5 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 2 Arson Units, 2 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 7 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 137 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Assistant Chief Robert Franco, responded to a Major Emergency Structure Fire at 5935 South Western Avenue in Hyde Park.

Firefighters arrived quickly to discover a 200' x 150' one-story metal clad commercial structure fully involved with fire. The first-arriving Firefighters commenced bold defensive operations with master streams, only to have portions of lightweight structure collapse within moments of their arrival.

Though flames briefly threatened one commercial structure to the east, the fire was skilfully confined to the building of fire origin and extinguished in just 36 minutes.

There were no injuries.

Loss to 'Cisco Brothers Furniture' is still being tabulated. Firefighters will remain at the furniture manufacturing business until the morning, when LAFD Equipment Operators and Urban Search and Rescue Specialists will be deployed to assist Investigators in moving tons of debris to gain safe and efficient access to the interior of the building.

The cause of this Major Emergency fire remains under active investigation.

(video)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

60 Years Ago: The Assault On Engine Company 16

Monday, November 12, 2007 |

When hearing of Los Angeles Fire Department personnel being injured by senseless acts of aggression, many are quick to decry a current state of affairs.

In a nation where Firefighters are largely perceived as helpful and responsive, it is unfathomable for some to comprehend such hostility. No cowardly attack upon Los Angeles Firefighters however, has eclipsed the November 12, 1947 assault on Engine Company 16.

Fireman Everett Young. Click for more information...

From the Los Angeles Times...

ROCK HURLED ON FREEWAY KILLS FIREMAN

"Fireman Everett Hayden Young, 37, of 342 W. 46th St., was killed almost instantly last night when struck in the head by a large rock as he was driving a fire truck on the Arroyo Seco Parkway near Solano Ave. one-half mile north of Sunset Blvd.

Police said he was struck in a cascade of rocks and bottles thrown from a 50-foot embankment. Capt. J. B. McCluskey, seated beside Young, grabbed the wheel and brought the rig to a stop. Two other pieces of apparatus were also hit.

Young, who leaves his widow and two children, was with a special detail returning from an assignment. He was a member of Engine Co. 16 and had been with the department since 1936. Officers of the homicide detail took over the case last night."


The many needs of Young's widow and two sons were supported through the years by the Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemen's Fund.

To learn more about historical Fire Department incidents in the City of Los Angeles, we encourage you to visit the LAFD Museum in Hollywood, or view the on-line LAFD Historical Archive at:

www.lafire.com



Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Rebuilding or Remodeling? Ask The Question!

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Home under construction and ready for fire sprinklers. Click to learn more...Maybe you are one of many Americans planning for home renovation or remodeling in the months ahead. If so, the men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department want you to ask a single question:

What about Residential Fire Sprinklers?

Home is where you should feel the safest. Unfortunately, from a fire point of view, home is the most dangerous place to be.

When it comes to investing in your home, Los Angeles Firefighters want you to put life safety in the equation. We encourage you to obtain solid estimates and professional advice about Residential Fire Sprinklers from both your insurance agent and licensed contractor before you proceed.

While the single greatest impact on residential fire deaths is the use of Smoke Alarms, Residential Fire Sprinklers strongly complement the strengths of Smoke Alarms, and therefore save lives.

With the exception of terrorist attacks, there has never been a major loss of life fire (3 or more fatalities) in any building fully protected by Fire Sprinkler Systems.

Residential Fire Sprinklers are different from their commercial counterparts in several respects, and the single greatest impediment to their use seems to be the fictional portrayal of Fire Sprinklers in movies and television.

With modern concealed designs that can protect up to 400 square feet with a single sprinkler head, the widespread installation of these systems can drop to pennies per square foot, putting the cost of Fire Sprinklers in new construction on par with wall-to-wall carpeting and other common upgrades.

So before you make your final decision on a home renovation or remodeling project, please take a moment to learn about Residential Fire Sprinkler Systems at these informative websites:


...and remember to ask "What about Residential Fire Sprinklers?"


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Councilmember and Town Crier Honor LAFD Blog

Saturday, November 10, 2007 |

Despite its sophomoric presence, the Los Angeles Fire Department News & Information blog is proud to have been feted in diverse venues. None however, has been more heartfelt than the recent 'Los Angeles Town Crier Ambassador of Goodwill Award' bestowed this week by Don Garza, the Town Crier of Los Angeles.

His salute of the LAFD Blog for "extending goodwill across social and economic lines" is among the kindest and most revered accolades we have received.

To be honored among the likes of Ed Fuentes, Eric Garcetti, Deon Joseph, Blogdowntown and LAist by Garza and Councilmember Jan Perry, is humbling indeed.

Though our inability to leave the bunker prohibited us from attending the event, we wanted to thank Mr. Garza for the honor, and wish him well as an Ambassador of our City in an upcoming Town Crier competition.

On a more personal note, we'd like to thank Mr. Garza, who prominently resides in our Central City East, for his own on-line efforts. Never one to be marginalized, his frank and often introspective writing of inner City life helps us better understand both the challenge and diversity, including the diversity of opinion, among the 'Skid Row' residents we proudly serve.

To learn more about life in Central City East, please visit:

centralcitye.blogspot.com
-and-
scribeskidrow.blogspot.com



Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Heartbreak at Pico and Valencia

Thursday, November 08, 2007 |

Retired LAFD Chief Bill Goss shares with us the story of Jim Slinkard, seen second from left below...


"JAMES C. "JIM" SLINKARD, veteran fire fighter of Engine 8, who had his time in, a large part of which he spent at 8s, was asked one day when he was going to take it and he said, "not for a while, until the kids get a little bigger." It was at 1:39 p.m., the afternoon of November 8, 1941. Engine 8 got a long ring for a fire at 1357 Valencia. Autofireman Lawrence Richerson headed the wagon north to Pico street and Valencia; slowed down, taking the corner at about 12 to 15 miles per hour, thinking the company might lay a line, but seeing several other companies in front of the location, proceeded on down the street to the address. As soon as the rig came to a stop, Fireman Ray Moon, who rode the tail board with Slinkard, ran up to the front of the apparatus and said that at the corner Jim had fallen off the rig. Richerson backed the wagon up a short ways and, parking it, ran back to the scene of the accident.

Engineer Eugene Briggs, who had been following the wagon with his pump at a distance of about 60 feet, saw Slinkard, who was riding the left rear side of the hose wagon, lose his balance as the wagon made the turn. Jim tried unsuccessfully to regain his hand hold and fell to the street, landing on his back and rolling over one and a half times, ending face down on the pavement. Briggs stopped the pump and got out to render what first aid he could and see what was the matter.

Meanwhile, Chief Bennett, Chief of Battalion 4, rolled up to the Valencia street address and was notified by Captain Sims of Engine 50 that it was only a refrigerant leak. The Chief then noticed the commotion at the corner of Pico and proceeded there to see what had happened. He dispatched his operator to call an ambulance and Slinkard was quickly removed to the nearby Receiving Hospital, where it was found that he was unconscious, due to a severe concussion and subdural hemorrhaging of the brain. His skull was not fractured as he had fastened the chin strap on his helmet and never lost it in the fall. The shock of the impact was the cause of the injury. Growing steadily worse, Slinkard was removed to surgery at 3:00 p.m. in an attempt to remove some of the internal pressure in his head. However, all the efforts of the staff of the hospital were of no avail, and Jim Slinkard passed away at 6:45 p.m. of the same day.

James Slinkard was born at Burfettville, Missouri on October 12, 1888, and he was survived by his wife, Mrs. Ruby Slinkard and their two children. He served in the armed forces during World War I and came to the Los Angeles Fire Department June 8, 1920. Funeral services were held at Edwards Brothers chapel with the pastor of St. Matthias Episcopal church officiating, assisted by the chaplain of the Relief Association. Interment was at Inglewood Park with the Fire Fighters' Post No. 102 in charge of the grave side rites."


To learn more about the history of the Los Angeles Fire Department, plan your visit to the LAFD Museum and Fallen Firefighter Memorial in Hollywood:

www.lafdmuseum.org



Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Firefighters Swiftly Tackle Hollywood Apartment Fire

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On Thursday, November 8, 2007 at 4:12 PM, 12 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 3 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, 2 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 74 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel, assisted by 1 Task Force of Los Angeles County Firefighters deployed in Automatic Aid, all under the direction of LAFD Battalion Chief Chris Kawai, responded to a Greater Alarm Structure Fire at 1541 North Martel Avenue in Hollywood.

Firefighters arrived quickly to discover intense flames showing from a 2nd floor window on the south side of a three-story apartment building. Extending hoselines down long hallways of the mostly center-hallway structure, Firefighters engaged in fierce battle with well entrenched flames in the one unit.

As thick smoke all but filled adjacent hallways, additional teams of Firefighters scoured the adjacent apartments in the 53-unit building, assisting occupants in their evacuation as well as sheltering several others in place. The fire was confined to the apartment of origin and fully extinguished in just 32 minutes.

There were no injuries.

The one woman displaced by the blaze received placement assistance from the building owner. Loss from the fire is estimated at $140,000 ($120,000 structure & $20,000 contents). The cause of the fire remains under investigation.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Never Forgotten: The Gray Building Fire

Tuesday, November 06, 2007 |

The Gray Building fire in Los Angeles. November 6, 1939.The infamous Gray Building fire of November 6, 1939, brought forth a massive and noteworthy deployment of Los Angeles Fire Department apparatus and personnel.

With gleaming nameplates of American LaFrance and Seagrave, the recently purchased vehicles were considered the most innovative on the continent, especially in the post-Depression era. The genuine pride of Los Angeles however, was never vested in the vehicles, but rather in those who bravely responded upon them.

The Fire

The first report of fire at the Gray Building was made to the LAFD's Westlake Signal Office by telephone. Unfortunately, the caller stated a location of 3336 South Broadway, several miles south of the actual fire. A few minutes later, at 2:03 PM, Street Box Alarm 1133, at Third and Broadway was pulled by someone who saw smoke coming from the five-story Gray Building at 336 South Broadway.

The initial response of Engines 3, 4, 5, 16, Trucks 3 and 4, Salvage 3, Rescue 23 and Battalion 1 would include two LAFD members answering their last alarm in a blaze that continues to inspires us - and many members of our community - to put the needs of others ahead of their own.

Unspeakable Loss

Fireman Joe Kacl was killed instantly during fire attack when a massive printing press thundered down upon him following a floor collapse.

His wife Kathryn, later penned...

"To the members of the Los Angeles Fire Department

I wish to express my very sincere gratitude to the men of the Los Angeles Fire Dept. I will never be able to completely thank you for the many kindnesses and heartfelt concern you have extended. I do not know how I could have gone through this period without the very capable and sympathetic aid of the members of your organization.

It is deep comfort to know that if Joe had to go, he went doing his job to the best of his ability and with men he loved and admired. Joe would not have wanted me to regret his being a fireman in view of what has happened. He was proud to be a fireman and he enjoyed his work and the men he worked with.

The men of the Fire Dept. have in so many lovely ways shown their respect and admiration for Joe that my heart is full. I can say in all sincerity that I am proud Joe was one of you.

No one can quite conceive the vast emptiness his going has left, but I will not be less brave than Joe or the men he worked with.

Sincerely,
Mrs. Kathryn Kacl"


A Promise Always Fulfilled...

It should be mentioned that Mrs. Kacl was pregnant with the couple's first child at the time of her husbands death. Though Joe never had a chance to gaze into his son's eyes, he never feared for his family's future, knowing that the Widows and Orphans Fund of the Los Angeles Firemen's Relief Association would take good care of those he loved.

...Even When Tragedy Grows

Autofireman John Hough was leading the attempt to extricate the body of John Kacl from the frightfully unstable Gray Building when another of the heavy timber floors from above gave way, striking him across the helmet with a massive floor joist.

Dazed, he continued working despite a severe headache which lasted for several shifts. A few nights later, while on-duty, he awoke to find himself suffering the first of several bouts of paralysis. Hough died December 11, 1939 of what was believed to be a brain hemorrhage.

Like the wife and son of his beloved colleague, Hough's family was given comfort, hope and decades of support from the Widows and Orphan's Fund of the Los Angeles Firemen's Relief Association. It's mission? To see that our loved ones never walk alone. It's a promise we've made, and with your help, one we aim to keep.

You can learn more about the Gray Building Fire by visiting the LAFD Museum, or view additional information, including dramatic photos of the blaze at the LAFD Historical Archive:

www.lafire.com


To support the Widows, Orphan's and Disabled Firemen's Fund:

www.lafra.org



Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Remembering "A Hurricane of Fire" in Los Angeles

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Los Angeles Fireman battles famous Bel Air Fire
During the week of November 6, 1961, the City of Los Angeles was visited by one of the most disastrous Southern California brush fires to date.

Lashing out from a point of origin high on the north slope of the Santa Monica Mountains, the fire raced through tinder-dry vegetation to the summit, leaped across Mulholland Drive and raged down the south slope into Stone Canyon on a rapidly widening front.

Driven savagely before fifty-mile-per-hour winds, the flames sped on south and westward. The canyons and ridges of the coastal slope became engulfed in a veritable hurricane of fire. Thermal air currents, created by the intense heat, coupled with the high velocity winds swirled countless thousands of burning brands aloft to deposit them far in advance of the main fire front.

Natural and man-made barriers were utterly incapable of interrupting the progress of the fire under such adverse conditions.

Before the wild rush of this roaring destruction was finally subdued, 6,090 acres of valuable watershed had been consumed. Infinitely more tragic was the incineration of 484 costly residences and 21 other buildings.

As this great fire gained in intensity, a second blaze was criminally ignited in Benedict Canyon which lies a mile to the east of Stone Canyon...

To learn more about the firestorm and those who fought it, please read the:

Official report from the Los Angeles Fire Department archives



Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Grand Opening of New Fire Station 36 in San Pedro

Sunday, November 04, 2007 |

The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department welcome you to join Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, Councilmember Janice Hahn, Fire Chief Douglas Barry, Fire Commissioners, City Engineer Gary Lee Moore, and civic and community leaders at the public dedication and grand opening of the LAFD's newest Neighborhood Fire Station 36 in San Pedro.

There will be entertainment for the kids, food, and antique fire apparatus.

Saturday, November 10, 2007
10:00 AM
New Fire Station 36
1005 N. Gaffey St.
San Pedro, CA 90731

We are pleased to offer an event flyer, as well as an interactive map and driving directions.

The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department look forward to seeing you on Saturday, November 10 in San Pedro!

(event photos)


Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

After The Fire: Your Emotional Well-Being

Thursday, November 01, 2007 |

After The Fire - Your Emotional Well-Being. Click for more information...After a disaster, such as the recent Southen California wildfires, many of us - including those who witnessed events from afar, can begin to experience sadness, anger, guilt or numbness. Trouble sleeping, being constantly "on the lookout" for danger, or jumpy and irritable are among the myriad of symptoms.

Even something predictable and earlier survived, like a rainstorm, seasonal winds or media reports of another disaster, may bring a sudden, overwhelming and inexplicable sense of anxiety. These are all normal reactions to stress.

Keep in mind that returning to the way we felt before a disaster may take time. If you are having trouble managing your feelings, completing daily tasks, or caring for your family, please talk to a psychologist, social worker, or professional counselor.

Among the help available throughout Southern California is a 2-1-1 hotline. 2-1-1 is a toll-free number available around the clock to help you connect with health and human services, including crisis management and intervention referral. Here are some additional resources:

American Psychological Association: 1-800-964-2000

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

National Center for Child Traumatic Stress: 1-310-235-2633

National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

National Child Abuse Hotline: 1-800-4-A-CHILD (422-4453)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department