If You Have Ten Minutes and Forty-One Cents You Too Can Make a Hero Happy

Wednesday, October 31, 2007 |

During the recent Fire Storms, thousands of Firefighters from hundreds of neighborhoods throughout California and our neighboring states, spent several weeks away from their families battling two dozen major fires, protecting the communities that we serve. Firefighters are honored to have the respect and gratitude that has been bestowed upon them by the public, and yet, we recognize that our small sacrifice pales in comparison to the sacrifice that the Men and Women of the United States Military make every day.

As we approach this holiday season, the Men and Women of the Los Angeles Fire Department would like to say a BIG “Thank You” to those individuals who sacrifice so much to protect our communities. The truth is, Firefighters will return home and many will be spending the holidays with family and friends. Unfortunately, the Men and Women who protect our nation daily, will not. This dedication and commitment should never be taken lightly.

A Georgia radio station has embarked upon a letter writing campaign, attempting to send over 375,000 letters to our troops, showing the Nations support thru the written word. If any Hero’s truly deserve a BIG “Thank You” during this holiday season, it would be the Men and Women serving this great country abroad.

This is one of those rare chances we get in life where 10 minutes and 41 Cents can say so much, to so many. We would like to take this opportunity to invite every reader to join us in this letter writing campaign. The radio station is requesting that NO donations accompany the letters. This is strictly a letter writing campaign.

For address and additional information click here or for a PDF Flyer


Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Have Fun, Say Thanks, Give Help... at the Firefighters Halloween Bash in Hollywood

Monday, October 29, 2007 |

Firefighters Costume Bash. Click for more information...Join us for the Firefighters Ghouls & Ghosts Halloween Costume Bash at the sizzling Cabana Club in Hollywood on Tuesday October 30, 2007 from 9:00PM to 2:00AM.

With 3 fully stocked, no host bars and several dance floors it’s a fast, fun-filled, five hour chance to meet and greet Firefighters, all while supporting a truly worthy cause.

Will you join us?

Admission for this charity fundraiser is $5 for Firefighters with valid I.D. and $20 for the general public; paid at the door, with all proceeds benefitting the Widows, Orphans, and Disabled Firemen’s Fund.

The Cabana Club
1439 North Ivar Avenue
Hollywood CA 90028


Need an event flyer or more information? Contact Marlene Casillas at the Los Angeles Firemen's Relief Association: (213) 480-4317.

Don't forget your costume! See you there!


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

L.A. County Opens Wildfire Victim Assistance Centers

Thursday, October 25, 2007 |

The Los Angeles Fire Department encourages you to share this information with friends and family in the County of Los Angeles who are in need of assistance following the recent wildfires...

"The Los Angeles County Operational Area will open three Local Assistance Centers for fire victims in coordination with the Governor's Office of Emergency Services. The local assistance centers will serve as one-stop sources for disaster relief services including information on how to replace records lost in the fires, file insurance claims and apply for assistance and housing. They will provide a single place for victims of the wildfires to get help in starting their recovery process.

President George Bush approved Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s request for a Major Disaster Declaration in California. The declaration will assist fire victims with resources like grants and temporary housing, disaster unemployment assistance and low interest loans for businesses.

The three Local Assistance Centers will open on Friday, October 26, 2007. The hours of operation for the centers are Monday through Friday from 8 A.M. to 7 P.M., Saturday from 8 A.M. to 4 P.M. and Sunday from 9 A.M. to 2 P.M. The hours and days are subject to change.

Below are the locations of the Local Assistance Centers that will open on Friday, October 26, 2007:

George A. Caravalho Sports Complex
Activity Center-Canyon Rooms (A&B)
20880 Centre Pointe Parkway
Santa Clarita, CA 91350-2974

Castaic Regional Sports Complex
31230 Castaic Road
Castaic, CA 91384
(This center will open at 12 P.M. on Friday, October 26, 2007.)

Malibu Bluffs Park
24250 Pacific Coast Highway
Malibu, CA 90265

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announces that residents and business owners who sustained losses in the designated counties can begin applying for assistance by registering online at www.fema.gov or by calling
1-800-621-FEMA (3362) OR 1-800-462-7585 (TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired. The toll-free telephone numbers for California will operate 24 hours Monday through Sunday.

Various Federal, State, County, and local agencies will be represented at the Local Assistance Centers. The participating agencies expected to be at the sites are the following:

FEDERAL
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
-FEMA Hazardous Mitigation
-Applicant Services
Small Business Administration (SBA)

STATE
Department of Public Social Services
Office of Emergency Services
Department of Insurance
State Contractor’s License Board
State Franchise Tax Board
Board of Equalization
California Veteran Affairs
Employment Development Department
Department of Motor Vehicles
Department of Health Services

COUNTY
Consumer Affairs
Mental Health
Assessors Office
Department of Public Social Services (DPSS)
Department of Public Works – Building Safety
Public Health
Health Services

NON-PROFITS
American Red Cross
Call 211 Los Angeles County
Emergency Network Los Angeles (ENLA)"
# # #



Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Firefighters Provide Tips For Donating to Wildfire Victims

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The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department have been deeply touched by those who have opened their hearts, homes and more to Southern California wildfire victims. As we begin to grasp the enormity of the disaster, there remains an opportunity for each of us to help those in need.

Sadly, in a heartfelt effort to help, many have spent time and effort collecting items that are truly not needed or cannot be delivered to or used by those in need.

While it may feel right to donate a truckload of blankets, make 500 ham sandwiches or clean out our closets of nearly new clothes the very best and most efficient thing we can do is fund and support established charitable and relief organizations.

In fact, this FEMA press release says it best...

"WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is urging those who want to help the people of affected by the fires in California to make cash donations to nonprofit organizations that are active in disaster work. A list of national organizations involved in disasters can be found at www.nvoad.org and at the Network for Good’s Web site at www.networkforgood.org

Officials also urged people who want to help to contact a registered relief organization to see if they can help through that organization. People going on their own to a disaster site can disrupt life-saving response operations. A good Web site to find organizations that are working in the disaster can be found at www.helpindisaster.org

Officials said that cash donations allow voluntary organizations to both obtain goods and services locally and for some to issue direct financial assistance to victims so they can meet their needs. They also allow agencies to avoid the labor-intensive need to clean, sort, package, label, and store donated goods. Donated money avoids, too, the expense of ground or air transportation that donated goods require.

Voluntary organizations provide a wide variety of services after disasters, such as clean up, child care, housing repair, crisis counseling, sheltering and food.

To find out what voluntary organizations are working in the impacted areas, and how to direct a cash donation to them, donors should go online to www.nvoad.org

FEMA coordinates the federal government’s role in preparing for, preventing, mitigating the effects of, responding to and recovering from all domestic disasters, whether natural or man-made, including acts of terror."
# # #



Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Southern California Disaster Recovery Assistance Information

Wednesday, October 24, 2007 |

The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department wish to extend our deepest sympathy to those who have lost so much in the recent Southern California wildfires. Our friends at the Los Angeles County Office of Emergency Management have released the following information in an effort to better assist those individuals in need of assistance.

"October 24, 2007

How to Apply for Assistance:

* Those in the counties designated for assistance to affected residents and business owners can begin the disaster application process by registering online at www.fema.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or 1-800-462-7585 (TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired. The toll-free telephone numbers are available 24 hours a day Monday through Sunday until further notice. Applicants registering for aid should be prepared to provide basic information about themselves (name, permanent address, and phone number), insurance coverage and any other information to help substantiate losses.

* Application procedures for local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

Assistance for Affected Individuals and Families Can Include as Required:

* Rental payments for temporary housing for those whose homes are unlivable. Initial assistance may be provided for up to three months for homeowners and at least one month for renters. Assistance may be extended if requested after the initial period based on a review of individual applicant requirements.
(Source: FEMA funded and administered.)

* Grants for home repairs and replacement of essential household items not covered by insurance to make damaged dwellings safe, sanitary and functional.
(Source: FEMA funded and administered.)

* Grants to replace personal property and help meet medical,dental, funeral, transportation and other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance or other federal, state and charitable aid programs.
(Source: FEMA funded at 75 percent of total eligible costs; 25 percent funded by the state.)

* Unemployment payments up to 26 weeks for workers who temporarily lost jobs because of the disaster and who do not qualify for state benefits, such as self-employed individuals.
(Source: FEMA funded; State administered.)

* Low-interest loans to cover residential losses not fully compensated by insurance. Loans available up to $200,000 for primary residence; $40,000 for personal property, including renter losses. Loans available up to $1.5 million for business property losses not fully compensated by insurance.
(Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)

* Loans up to $1.5 million for small businesses that have suffered disaster-related cash flow problems and need funds for working capital to recover from the disaster's adverse economic impact. This loan in combination with a property loss loan cannot exceed a total of $1.5 million.
(Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)

* Loans up to $500,000 for farmers, ranchers and agriculture operators to cover production and property losses, excluding primary residence.
(Source: Farm Service Agency, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.)

* Other relief programs: Crisis counseling for those traumatized by the disaster; income tax assistance for filing casualty losses; advisory assistance for legal, veterans benefits and social security matters.

Jeanne O'Donnell
Los Angeles County
Office of Emergency Management"


Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Los Angeles County Health Officials Issue Alert

Monday, October 22, 2007 |

Recent wildfires in Southern California have significantly impacted air quality in our region. The Los Angeles Fire Department therefore brings to your attention a Health Alert from our friends at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health:

LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles County Health Officer is issuing a health alert due to the smoke and associated air pollution from fires in Malibu Canyon, Canyon Country, and the Santa Clarita area. Smoke from these fires includes small particles and gases that can cause health problems.

“Despite significant efforts toward fire containment, air quality in some parts of the County is being adversely affected by the fires,” said Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH, Director of Public Health and County Health Officer. “Small air particles carrying through Los Angeles County can have adverse health effects, and will be particularly unhealthful for sensitive individuals. Those individuals should avoid strenuous outdoor activities.”

Health officials recommend that “all individuals exercise caution and avoid unnecessary outdoor activities, and sensitive individuals limit prolonged exertion in smoke impacted areas. Schools in these areas should take care to assure that sensitive students also limit their outdoor physical activity such as engaging in strenuous team sports.”

In addition, due to strong Santa Ana wind conditions in the passes and canyons in Los Angeles County, concentrations of dust particles may also cause unhealthy air quality. All individuals are urged to exercise caution and minimize outdoor activities and sensitive individuals should limit prolonged exertion in the dust impacted areas as well.

Sensitive individuals at greatest risk include those with heart disease or lung diseases, including emphysema, asthma and chronic lung problems. These individuals should monitor their condition and be vigilant about taking their medicines as prescribed by their doctor. If their symptoms worsen, they should contact their doctor. In addition, the elderly are more susceptible to the effects of smoke and dust and should be contacted to be sure they are not feeling any ill effects and understand how to limit their exposure. Individuals with asthma should keep their “as needed” inhalers with them at all times.

Residents outside these affected areas should be aware that the presence of smoky odors and ash are not necessarily cause for health concerns. However, sensitive individuals should continue to monitor their condition and consult their physician if their symptoms worsen.

Staying indoors can somewhat reduce exposure to smoke and dust, and keeping doors and windows closed while running the air conditioner is a good idea. Residents should check the filters on their air conditioners and replace them regularly. Indoor air filtration devices with HEPA filters can reduce the level of particles that circulate indoors.

For more detailed information about air quality related to the wildfires, visit the South Coast Air Quality Management District’s website at www.aqmd.gov or call 1-800-CUT-SMOG (288-7664).

The Department of Public Health is committed to protecting and improving the health of the nearly 10 million residents of Los Angeles County. Through a variety of programs, community partnerships and services, Public Health overseas environmental health, disease control, and community and family health. Public Health comprises more than 4,000 employees and an annual budget exceeding $750 million. To learn more about Public Health and the work we do, please visit www.lapublichealth.org

# # #


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Wind-Whipped Sun Valley Blaze Causes $1.25M Damage

Sunday, October 21, 2007 |

On Sunday, October 21, 2007 at 5:04 PM, 35 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 6 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Urban Search and Rescue Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, the LAFD Tractor Company, 3 EMS Battalion Captains, 4 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team and other specialized resources, a total of 209 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief Ronnie Villanueva responded to a Major Emergency Structure Fire at 8098 San Fernando Road in Sun Valley.

Firefighters arrived quickly during a severe windstorm to discover heavy smoke showing from the central portion of a 100' x 200' one-story row of commercial businesses, and in moments thereafter, wind-whipped fire through the roof.

The firefight briskly transitioned to a defensive posture with heavy streams, as embers driven by 30+mph winds spread - and were quickly tackled upon igniting a residence across the street.

A series of explosions resonated from inside the enterprise of fire origin, as combustible products and aerosol propellants on and near a truck parked within the business were consumed by the swift-moving flames.

Firefighters confined the bulk of the fire to 'River Plate Trucking' a firm involved with the transport of packaged cosmetics, extinguishing the blaze in less than 70 minutes.

There were no injuries.

Firefighters prevented significant fire damage and assured business continuity to the adjoining 'Armcraft', a home design and remodeling business, as well as the 'Sun Valley Dairy', a manufacturer of Greek-style Yogurt.

Los Angeles Firefighters used tractors to stabilize the structurally unsound portions of the building, and planned to remain on scene for at least two days to assure site safety and a comprehensive investigation.

Loss from the blaze is estimated at $1,251,000 ($751,000 structure & $250,000 contents), all but $1,000 of which was limited to the structure of origin.

The cause of the fire remains under active investigation.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD 'Breaking News' Alerts Debut

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Did you ever wonder how news reporters always have the latest scoop about emergencies in Los Angeles? How do helicopter news crews and press photographers end up in the right place at the right time?

Wonder no more.

The Los Angeles Fire Department is pleased to report that LAFD ALERT and LAFD Twitter are out of beta!

LAFD ALERT and LAFD Twitter are free services that provide you with incident information at the same time we provide it to the news media. Now, you can know exactly when to turn on the TV or radio for more information about breaking news of interest to you.

It's enlightening - and it's free.

As a regular reader of after-action reports on the LAFD News & Information blog, you've probably desired earlier details about significant incidents. LAFD ALERT and LAFD Twitter offer just that.

Get breaking Los Angeles Fire Department news your way...

...via e-mail: http://bit.ly/LAFD_ALERT

...via SMS (cell phone) text message: http://twitter.com/LAFD


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Responds to 'Buckweed Fire' near Agua Dulce

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Pursuant of a formal Mutual Aid Request, the Los Angeles Fire Department has assigned two Strike Teams of Firefighters to assist the Los Angeles County Fire Department in their battle against a brush fire between Agua Dulce and Canyon Country, California, twelve miles north of our City.


View Larger Map (you can also click, grab and zoom the map above!)


These 22 personnel from the Los Angeles Fire Department have been dispatched to the "Buckweed Fire" in accordance with California's Fire & Rescue Emergency Mutual Aid System, administered by the Governor's Office of Emergency Services. The system is designed to ensure that additional resources are provided to local jurisdictions whenever their own resources are committed or insufficient for a specific emergency incident.

The City of Los Angeles remains fully protected by the use of additional staff and reserve apparatus to cover foreseeable local needs, and we remind local residents that these resources can be recalled to our City as necessary.

The men and women of the LAFD ask motorists to remain watchful for these and other convoys of emergency apparatus, and to be mindful of the space necessary for them to safely maneuver on local roads and highways.

Pursuant of protocol, official public and media information regarding this wildfire incident, including the actions of assigned LAFD personnel, will be provided by the Los Angeles County Fire Department, which maintains daily jurisdictional authority of the area where the fire is burning.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Responds To 'Canyon Fire' in Malibu

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Pursuant of a formal Mutual Aid Request, the Los Angeles Fire Department has assigned three Strike Teams of Firefighters, two LAFD Helicopters, one seasonally contracted Helitanker, one Water Tender and one Assistant Chief Officer as an agency representative, to assist the Los Angeles County Fire Department in their battle against a brush fire in the Santa Monica Mountains near Malibu, California, seven miles west of our City.


View Larger Map (you can also click, grab and zoom the map above!)


These 125 personnel from the Los Angeles Fire Department have been dispatched to the "Canyon Fire" in accordance with California's Fire & Rescue Emergency Mutual Aid System, administered by the Governor's Office of Emergency Services. The system is designed to ensure that additional resources are provided to local jurisdictions whenever their own resources are committed or insufficient for a specific emergency incident.

The City of Los Angeles remains fully protected by the use of additional staff and reserve apparatus to cover foreseeable local needs, and we remind local residents that these resources can be recalled to our City as necessary.

The men and women of the LAFD ask motorists to remain watchful for these and other convoys of emergency apparatus, and to be mindful of the space necessary for them to safely maneuver on local roads and highways.

Pursuant of protocol, official public and media information regarding this wildfire incident, including the actions of assigned LAFD personnel, will be provided by the Los Angeles County Fire Department, which maintains daily jurisdictional authority of the area where the fire is burning.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Wildfire Erupts North of Porter Ranch

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PLEASE NOTE THE DATE OF THIS ARTICLE

If you are looking for the October 13,2008 'Sesnon Fire' that started near Porter Ranch, please click here now.



On Sunday, October 21, 2007 at 5:50 AM, Los Angeles Firefighters responded in Automatic Aid to a reported brush fire just north of Porter Ranch. Though the fire was in Los Angeles County Fire Department jurisdiction, the Los Angeles Fire Department took command of the blaze due to high wildfire activity in the region.

At 9:00 AM, Los Angeles Firefighters declared the blaze 'contained' at no more than 20 acres. There have been no injuries. No structures were threatened or damaged by this blaze, and there were no formal evacuations.

The cause of the fire - which remained entirely outside the City of Los Angeles, is under investigation.

A pair of Los Angeles County Fire Department Brush Patrol units will remain at the scene today due to continuing high winds.

Local residents are encouraged to monitor local television and radio news for updates on this and other Southern California wildfires.

The map below represents the general vicinity of the fire and NOT the actual footprint or acreage.

View Larger Map (you can also click, grab and zoom the map above!)

Submitted by Ron Myers & Brian Humphrey, Spokesmen
Los Angeles Fire Department

Video: Help! Fire! - Home Inspection

Friday, October 19, 2007 |


From Crackle: Help! Fire! Episode 4


A new six-part video series featuring the Los Angeles Fire Department is being broadcast on the web during October 2007.

Titled "Help! Fire!", the series was produced for the William Rolland Firefighter Education Institute by award-winning producers David and Cameron Barrett.

"Help! Fire!" highlights the things every homeowner can do to make their environment safer. You'll learn about the dangers lurking in your home or apartment, what to do if you find yourself on fire, how to put out small fires, how the 9-1-1 system works, and much, much more.
# # #


NOTE: The embedded video player above commences with "Help! Fire!" and then offers random Fire Service videos from across our nation.

Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Your 'Old' Cell Phone May Not Work in 2008!

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Is this an analog cellular telephone?Do you receive cellular phone service via an older, analog-only handset?

Did you stow away an old analog-only cell phone for the exclusive purpose of calling 9-1-1?

Beginning at midnight on February 18, 2008, your service for these older devices may be affected!

As of that date, cellular phone companies are no longer required to provide analog cellular service.

If you have a handset with such advanced features such as text or instant messaging, Internet browsing, or an integrated camera, then you do not have an analog handset. Handsets with these features are digital handsets.

Customers with digital handsets will not be affected by this change!

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requires cellular phone companies to notify their customers at least four months before they plan to discontinue analog cellular service, and again at least one month before discontinuing analog service.

Customers who receive a discontinuance notice from their cellular phone company and still have questions - or who want to know whether their coverage may be affected when they "roam" into another provider's service area, should contact their cellular phone company directly.

Some other devices, including residential alarm systems and vehicle telematics (i.e. OnStar ®) may also be effected by this change. To find out more about the "analog cellular sunset", visit:

www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/analogcellphone.html



Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Kindly share this information using the 'Email this' link below

Silverlake Fire Consumes Home on Hillside Property

Monday, October 15, 2007 |

On Monday, October 15, 2007 at 1:22 PM, 11 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 5 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 3 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, DWP and DOT, all under the direction of Battalion Chief Raymundo Gomez, responded to a Greater Alarm Structure Fire at 1945 N. Preston Av. in the Silver Lake area.

The first responding unit on scene found heavy smoke and fire coming from the rear of a large, two story, single family dwelling and requested two additional Task Forces. The secondary size up indicated that the fire was located in a smaller, second residence to the rear of the property, a split level single family dwelling with heavy fire and smoke showing from a room to the rear of the structure which had extended into the attic space. An asserted interior fire attack coordinated with ventilation was aggressively ensued.

It took 74 firefighters 26 minutes to call a knock down on the fire. The blaze consumed the entire kitchen area and the attic which caused extensive char and smoke damage to the majority of the dwelling. The cause of the fire is undetermined at this time. The dollar loss was estimated at $250,000 [$150,000 to the structure and $100,000 to the contents]. No other structures were threatened by the blaze and there were no civilian injuries reported. Three Firefighters were assessed by Paramedics for heat related symptoms and transported to Huntington Memorial Hospital for observation. The occupant of the structure declined relocation assistance.

Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

Fire Takes Life near Glassell Park

Sunday, October 14, 2007 |

On Sunday, October 14, 2007 at 6:31 AM, 6 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 4 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 3 Arson Units, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 47 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief Alberto Abarca responded to a Civilian Fatality Structure Fire at 3133 Division Street near Glassell Park.

Firefighters arrived quickly to find smoke showing from the front of a well-secured one-story single family home. Firefighters made forcible entry with hand and power tools to do battle with intense fire within the home.

While attacking the flames, Firefighters discovered and rescued a pair of burned, unconscious and non-breathing female adults from separate rooms at the rear of the residence. A mixed-breed pet canine was also pulled from the smoke charged home by Firefighters.

Despite the advanced life support efforts of Firefighters, one of the women, who exhibited no vital signs of life, was declared deceased shortly after arrival at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center.

Firefighters were able however, to restore and assist breathing for the other woman, who they transported in critical condition to the Glendale Adventist Medical Center.

The 59 year-old woman, a friend of the deceased, sustained full-thickness (2nd & 3rd degree) burns to her face, neck, hands and back, and thermal injury to her mouth and nose. She was later transferred to the Grossman Burn Center at Sherman Oaks Hospital.

The fire was skilfully confined to the front portion of the home and extinguished in less than 18 minutes. The rescued dog, exhibiting no outward signs of illness or injury, was comforted briefly by Firefighters before being placed in the trusted care of a neighbor.

No other injuries were reported.

Firefighters found no evidence of functional Smoke Alarms within the home, as required by law. The two bedroom residence was fitted with code-compliant security doors and window bars, and there is no immediate indication that they or any other factor became an impairment to egress. The building was not equipped with fire sprinklers.

A positive identification of the deceased woman, as well as the exact cause, time and manner of her death will be determined by Coroner's officials.

Monetary loss from the fire is estimated at $85,000 ($60,000 structure & $25,000 contents). The cause of this early morning blaze is categorized as 'accidental' and remains under active investigation.

(video)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Southern California, It’s Getting Cold Outside!

Saturday, October 13, 2007 |

When we think of the last two of the four temperate seasons, fall and winter, we envision falling autumn leaves, rainfall, cooler weather, shorter days, beautiful snowfalls, skiing, sledding, hot toddies in front of the fireplace – oh yeah, even in Southern California. Then there are those of us who start to panic when the first leaves begin to fall off the trees – "What am I preparing for Thanksgiving" and "I haven’t finished my Christmas shopping!"

Putting panic aside, the change in temperature is a signal to prepare for the seasonal change. There are many problems that can arise. There can be power failures, flash floods which disrupt or shut down traffic flow and fires that start in unmaintained fireplaces and heating systems. The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department want to remind you that now is the time to prepare for the upcoming change in season.

Things to consider:

1. During power outages, use flashlights instead of candles and have plenty of batteries on hand.
2. If generators must be used, position them outside at a safe distance from the home and away from open windows.
3. Have fireplaces and heaters inspected prior to their 1st use.
4. Check smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms.
5. Don’t use barbeque pits, kitchen stoves or ovens as an indoor heating source.

Don’t forget preparing your vehicle.


1. What is the condition of your battery, tires and wiper blades?
2. When were the brakes last inspected?
3. Does the vehicle heating system function?
4. When was the vehicle last serviced?

The following websites contain helpful tips and information for getting prepared for the seasonal change:


http://www.airflowhtgair.com/html/winter/coldWeatherPreparation.htm
http://www.dmv.org/how-to-guides/inclement-weather.php
http://ugi.com/pressrelease/news092603.pdf
http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/ah_tips/article/0,,HGTV_3206_1531586,00.html
http://www.geminicarcare.com/my/checklist-winter.html
http://realestate.msn.com/Improve/Article2.aspx?cp-documentid=35967
http://longisland.about.com/od/weather/a/cold_weather.htm


Enjoy the seasonal change.



Submitted by d'Lisa Davies
Los Angeles Fire Department

Video: Help! Fire! - Fire Extinguishers

Friday, October 12, 2007 |


From Crackle: Help! Fire! Episode 3


A new six-part video series featuring the Los Angeles Fire Department is being broadcast on the web during October 2007.

Titled "Help! Fire!", the series was produced for the William Rolland Firefighter Education Institute by award-winning producers David and Cameron Barrett.

"Help! Fire!" highlights the things every homeowner can do to make their environment safer. You'll learn about the dangers lurking in your home or apartment, what to do if you find yourself on fire, how to put out small fires, how the 9-1-1 system works, and much, much more.
# # #


NOTE: The embedded video player above commences with "Help! Fire!" and then offers random Fire Service videos from across our nation.

Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Man Dies in Van Nuys Apartment Fire

Thursday, October 11, 2007 |

On Thursday, October 11, 2007 at 5:37 PM, 14 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 5 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 3 Arson Units, 2 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 2 EMS Battalion Captains, 3 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team, under the direction of Assistant Chief Timothy Manning responded to a Civilian Fatality Structure Fire at 8070 Langdon Avenue in Van Nuys.

Firefighters arrived to find a three-story apartment complex with heavy fire in one unit on the third floor. Firefighters immediately began to attack the fire from within the apartment as fellow Firefighters provided vertical ventilation from the roof.

Initial reports indicated that there was possibly one person missing who may have exited the apartment, and then returned to the unit for an unknown reason.

During firefighting operations, an initial search was conducted and Firefighters discovered the body of a twenty-eight year-old male within the apartment unit.

Seventy-Five Firefighters were able to contain the fire in twenty minutes and contain the bulk of the damage to one apartment on the third floor. The cause of the fire and the circumstances of the fatality remain under investigation. The dollar loss is still being tabulated.


Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Family of Four Avoids Disaster in Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

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On Thursday, October 11, 2007 at 3:05 AM, 1 Company of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, under the direction of Battalion Chief Charles Butler responded to a Carbon Monoxide Poisoning at 12255 Burbank Boulevard in Valley Glen.

Firefighters arrived on scene to find a family of four, the father and infant outside and the mother and daughter inside the apartment, complaining of nausea, dizziness and drowsiness. The father stated that he had lit the heater for the first time this year and went to bed for the night.

At approximately 3 AM, the father woke up and immediately recognized that something was wrong. The father, having difficulty staying awake himself, dialed 911 and began opening the windows to ventilate the apartment and attempted, but was unable, to wake the other family members. The father, though significantly impaired himself, was able to remove the infant from the apartment and make his way to the courtyard below.

Even though the father was unable to physically remove the mother and daughter from the apartment, his actions allowed the others inside the apartment to begin breathing fresh air and their conditions improved. The family, a 37 year-old male, 36 year-old female, 11 year-old female, and a 1 year-old female were assessed by paramedics at the scene and were found to be awake and their conditions improving.

All patients were transported to Providence St. Joseph Hospital in serious but stable condition. The Gas Company will be evaluating the scene to determine the source of the Carbon Monoxide exposure.

Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Firefighters Expose an Invisible Killer

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Each year in America, unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning claims nearly 500 lives and sends another 15,000 people to hospital emergency rooms for treatment.

The Los Angeles Fire Department joins the United States Fire Administration and the National Association of Home Builders in reminding you of the danger of carbon monoxide fumes.

Understanding the Risk

What is carbon monoxide?

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you know it's in your home.

At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.

Where does carbon monoxide come from?

CO gas can come from several sources: gas-fired appliances, charcoal grills, wood-burning furnaces or fireplaces and motor vehicles.

Who is at risk?

Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning. Medical experts believe that unborn babies, infants, children, senior citizens and people with heart or lung problems are at even greater risk for CO poisoning.


When Your Carbon Monoxide Alarm Sounds
What to do depends on whether anyone is feeling ill.

If no one is feeling ill:

  1. Silence the alarm.

  2. Turn off all appliances and sources of combustion (i.e. furnace and fireplace).

  3. Ventilate the house with fresh air by opening doors and windows.

  4. Call a qualified professional to investigate the source of the possible CO buildup.

If illness is a factor:

  1. Evacuate all occupants immediately.

  2. Determine how many occupants are ill and determine their symptoms.

  3. Call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number. When relaying information to the dispatcher, include the number of people feeling ill.

  4. Do not re-enter the home without the approval of a public safety official or Fire Department representative.

  5. Call a qualified professional to repair the source of the CO.

Protect Your Family from CO Poisoning
  • Install at least one carbon monoxide alarm with an audible warning signal near sleeping areas and outside individual bedrooms.

  • Carbon monoxide alarms measure levels of CO over time and are designed to sound an alarm before an average, healthy adult would experience symptoms. It is very possible that you may not be experiencing symptoms when you hear the alarm. This does not mean that CO is not present.

  • Make sure your CO alarms carry the approval mark of a registered testing laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL), and are installed according to the manufacturer's printed instructions.

  • Have a qualified professional check all fuel burning appliances, furnaces, venting and chimney systems at least once a year.

  • Never use your range or oven to help heat your home and never use a charcoal grill or hibachi in your home or garage.

  • Never keep a car running in a garage. Even if the garage doors are open, normal circulation will not provide enough fresh air to reliably prevent a dangerous buildup of CO.

  • When purchasing an existing home, have a qualified technician evaluate the integrity of the heating and cooking systems, as well as the sealed spaces between the garage and house. The presence of a carbon monoxide alarm in your home can save your life in the event of CO buildup.


Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Explosion Rocks Granada Hills

Tuesday, October 09, 2007 |

On Tuesday, October 9, 2007 at 6:26 PM, 6 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Arson Unit, 1 Urban Search and Rescue Unit, 1 Hazardous Materials Team, 1 EMS Battalion Captain, and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, all under the direction of Battalion Chief Gregory Reynar responded to a reported Structure Fire at 10416 N. Collett Ave. in Granada Hills.

Firefighters arrived on scene to find a single-story, single-family home with heavy fire in the garage and attic area. It was immediately recognized that the garage portion of the home had experienced some type of explosion and suffered significant damage to the integrity of the structure. Firefighters immediately attacked the attic fire, thereby saving the main portion of the home. Due to the structural compromise of the garage, a defensive exterior fire attack was initiated and hose lines were put in place to protect nearby homes and vehicles. Several vehicles and nearby homes were also damaged during the fire.

It took forty-six Firefighters just twenty minutes to extinguish the blaze. There were no injuries reported and the cause remains under investigation. The loss is estimated at $305,000 ($200,000 Structure, $75,000 Contents and $30,000 to exposures)

Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Hollywood Hills Hiker Takes Near Fatal Tumble

Friday, October 05, 2007 |

On Friday, October 5, 2007 at 3:45 PM, 3 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 6 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Heavy Rescue, 3 Urban Search and Rescue Units, 2 Helicopters, 1 EMS Battalion Captain and 2 Battalion Chief Officer Command Teams, a total of 50 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel, joined by City of Los Angeles Park Rangers and Department of General Services Police Officers, all under the direction of Battalion Commander Jose S-Cronenbold, responded to a cliff rescue in the rugged Bronson Canyon area of the Hollywood Hills.

Firefighters were directed to a steep and rocky hillside more than 150 feet above the canyon floor, where they found a 24 year-old Connecticut man who had tumbled more than forty feet while trying to navigate the slippery terrain.

Discovering the cut-and-bruise covered man to have a severe left shoulder injury, as well as a compound fracture to his left ankle, they immediately summoned specialized LAFD ground and air teams.

Securing the man and themselves, Firefighters commenced medical care in the inhospitable terrain of the former quarry, as a flight-crew Paramedic and litter basket were lowered from a hovering helicopter.

The man was soon secured in the litter basket and though a helicopter hoist was initially anticipated, the loose, rocky and unstable soil beneath him was determined to be a greater danger from the helicopter rotor wash.

As such, an alternate plan was promptly pursued.

Using the skill and equipment of LAFD's municipal Urban Search and Rescue teams, the patient was quickly and effectively lowered to the canyon floor via a rope relay system. He was placed in an awaiting ambulance and transported to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in fair condition.

No other injuries were reported.

It was not immediately clear why the man was traversing the steep hillside in Bronson Canyon, the site of one or more cliff rescues a year by Los Angeles Firefighters.

Others have admitted to being drawn to the site, near the famous 'Hollywood' sign due to its eight decade history as a filming location.


Often mentioned is a short tunnel nearby that has served as a popular backdrop for countless productions, including the 1960's television series 'Batman'.

(incident news video) (photos)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Responds By Air and Sea To Sinking Ship

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On Friday, October 5, 2007 at 1:05 PM, 2 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 2 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 3 LAFD Fireboats, 5 LAFD Helicopters, 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team and 1 Division Chief Officer Command Team under the direction of Battalion Chief Richard Elder, responded jointly with the U.S. Coast Guard, Long Beach Fire Department and L.A. County Fire Department Lifeguard Division to a Sinking Vessel 2+ miles outside the Port of Los Angeles breakwater.

Summoned by a Marine Radio distress call, Los Angeles Fireboat crews, bolstered by their land-based colleagues and LAFD Helicopters, responded with allied agencies to a point approximately 7 miles offshore in rough seas to encounter the American Pride, a 130-foot tri-mast schooner with 40 persons aboard.

According to witnesses, the 66 year-old wood-hulled tallship had begun taking on water during an education voyage with student sailors from a Pasadena, California high school aboard.

Los Angeles Firefighters joined other responders in an active dewatering operation by the boat's crew, as they offered comfort and reassurance to the life-vest clad teens while the boat made its way slowly inside the breakwater with both students and Firefighters aboard.

No injuries were reported.

Once inside the breakwater, the vessel was safely guided to her home berth in the Port of Long Beach by Long Beach Fire Department and U.S. Coast Guard personnel.

(video)


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Haz-Mat Leak Near L.A. Cruise Terminal

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On Friday, October 5, 2007 at 8:20 AM, 5 Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, 3 LAFD Rescue Ambulances, 1 Hazardous Materials Task Force, 1 EMS Battalion Captain and 1 Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, a total of 38 Los Angeles Fire Department personnel under the direction of Battalion Chief Richard Elder, responded to a Hazardous Materials Investigation at Berth 92 of the World Cruise Center at the Port of Los Angeles.

Firefighters arrived quickly to find as many as a dozen 5 gallon canisters containing Sodium Hydroxide in a truck cargo trailer destined for delivery at the site.

The caustic product leaking from a single container emitted no fumes, but did appear to be reacting with the floor of trailer. Firefighters cordoned off the immediate area and stabilized the scene, before Fire Department Hazardous Materials experts determined the situation to be non-escalating.

There were no injuries, and no formal evacuations required.

Following a thorough hazard assessment by the LAFD Hazardous Materials team and their routine decontamination, the scene was turned over to the cargo handling firm to mitigate the spill within the trailer under the guidance of the Los Angeles County Fire Department's Health Hazardous Materials Division.


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

America's Most Beloved Fire Safety Educator

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As Fire Prevention Week approaches, we wanted to take a moment to salute America's favorite wildfire safety spokesperson bear.

Though the upcoming Fire Prevention Week focuses largely on residential fires, Smokey Bear's message "Only You Can Prevent Wildfires" is an inspiration for us to remain fire safe wherever we may be.

Dressed in a Ranger's hat, belted blue jeans and carrying a shovel, he is the most popular and longest running public service campaign in history. To understand how Smokey Bear (there is no 'the' in his name) became associated with wildfire prevention, we must go back to World War II.

At War with Fire

On December 7, 1941, Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor. The following spring, in 1942, a Japanese submarine surfaced near the coast of Southern California and fired a salvo of shells that exploded on an oil field near Santa Barbara, very close to the Los Padres National Forest north of Los Angeles.

With fear that wartime incendiary shells could set off raging forest fires, in addition to those already caused by people, protection of forests from uncontrolled fire became a matter of national importance, and a new idea was born. If people were urged to be more careful, perhaps fires could be prevented.

A variety of posters and slogans were subsequently created, encouraging people to prevent accidental fires and thereby help the War effort.

Bear or Bambi?

Walt Disney's motion picture, "Bambi", was produced in 1944 and Disney authorized the use of his creation for wildfire prevention. The Bambi poster was a success and proved that using an animal as a fire prevention symbol would work. Bambi could not be used in subsequent campaigns however, because it was on loan from Walt Disney Studios for only one year.

The Forest Service needed an animal for the wildfire prevention program. On August 9, 1944, the new fire prevention symbol was agreed upon by the Forest Service and the Wartime Council. Artist Albert Staehle was asked to paint the first poster of Smokey Bear. It showed a bear pouring a bucket of water on a campfire.

Deeply Beloved and Strongly Protected

Smokey Bear's name and evolving image are strictly protected by his very own U.S. Federal Law, the Smokey Bear Act, and he even has his own private zip code (20052) and website.

The endeavors of Smokey Bear are passionately administered on a full-time basis by three entities: the U.S. Forest Service, the National Association of State Foresters, and the Ad Council.

The men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department offer a respectful tip o' the helmet to all who have helped make Smokey Bear an enduring symbol of safety.

For more information on our friend Smokey Bear, please visit:




Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Video: Help! Fire! - Family Plan

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From Crackle: Help! Fire! Episode 2


A new six-part video series featuring the Los Angeles Fire Department is being broadcast on the web during October 2007.

Titled "Help! Fire!", the series was produced for the William Rolland Firefighter Education Institute by award-winning producers David and Cameron Barrett.

"Help! Fire!" highlights the things every homeowner can do to make their environment safer. You'll learn about the dangers lurking in your home or apartment, what to do if you find yourself on fire, how to put out small fires, how the 9-1-1 system works, and much, much more.
# # #


NOTE: The embedded video player above commences with "Help! Fire!" and then offers random Fire Service videos from across our nation.

Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Weekend

Thursday, October 04, 2007 |

As we prepare for our local Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service in Los Angeles on Saturday, October 13, 2007, the men and women of the Los Angeles Fire Department ask you to join them in recognizing this week's National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Weekend.

National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Weekend 2007. Click to learn more...Emmitsburg, MD – The National Fallen Firefighters Foundation (NFFF) and the Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) announce that the 26th annual National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Weekend will be held October 5-7, 2007.

A plaque with the names of 87 firefighters who died in the line of duty in 2006 will be added to the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial, located here on the National Fire Academy campus. The names of 4 firefighters who died in previous years will also be added. The plaques surrounding the Memorial, which was established in 1981, will contain the names of more than 3,100 firefighters.

Thirty-three states experienced line-of-duty deaths in 2006. Deaths resulted from many causes, including vehicle accidents while en route to or returning from emergency calls, training incidents, building collapses, being struck by objects (vehicles, trees) at the incident scene, falls, heart attacks, helicopter crashes, drowning, and burns.

Five multiple fatality incidents accounted for 15 deaths. Two multiple fatality incidents occurred at structural fires while the other three occurred during air operations or while fighting wild fires. Wildland fires, controlled burns, and air craft training/certification for wildland protection resulted in 20 fatalities.

New York suffered the Nation's greatest number of line-of-duty firefighter deaths in 2006 with 12, followed by North Carolina with 9, California with 8, and New Jersey with 5.

Hal Bruno, Chairman of the NFFF Board of Directors, stated: "Survivors and members of the fire service travel from across the country to honor their loved ones and fallen comrades at the Memorial Weekend. They receive emotional support and meet others who suffered loss. The Foundation's services are offered to the families and colleagues of fallen firefighters not only following a line-of-duty death but for years to come."

For more information about the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation call 301-447-1365 or visit www.firehero.org

There will be live satellite feeds and internet webcasts of both the Luminary Services on October 6th and the Memorial Service October 7th.



Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Promotes Cancer Awareness

Wednesday, October 03, 2007 |

Click to learn more about the fight against cancer...The Los Angeles Fire Department has partnered with the American Cancer Society to support and promote a cancer awareness campaign during October, which is recognized as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Virtually every member of the LAFD has been impacted by cancer in his or her life, either at home, or in providing compassionate pre-hospital care to cancer patients and their families.

As part of the Los Angeles Fire Department's strong involvement in the campaign, LAFD members are being permitted to wear personalized silicone wristlets on-duty during October.

Additionally, members will be permitted to show their solidarity by way of a small metal pink ribbon pin worn on their duty uniform.

In joining this effort, the men and women of the LAFD - including several who are cancer survivors, are not only supporting those who bravely battle the disease, but also seeking to educate the public that cancer prevention and early detection can mean the difference between life and death.

On October 27, 2007 between the hours of 10:00AM and 2:00PM, you are encouraged to join Firefighters and the American Cancer Society for a special informational event near you:

  • Fire Station 2 - Boyle Heights

  • Fire Station 15 - USC University Village

  • Fire Station 27 - Hollywood

  • Fire Station 33 - South Los Angeles

  • Fire Station 47 - El Sereno

  • Fire Station 60 - North Hollywood

  • Fire Station 64 - South Los Angeles

  • Fire Station 65 - Watts

  • Fire Station 98 - Pacoima

  • Frank Hotchkin Memorial Training Center - Elysian Park


  • Large welcoming banners will adorn the above stations, where we'll offer literature and information about low or no cost cancer screening. No reservations are necessary, and there is no obligation.

    Please join us at this free event, as we collectively affirm the LAFD axiom that Knowledge Is Power!

    You can prevent and survive cancer by calling 1-800-ACS-2345 or clicking:

    www.cancer.org



    Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
    Los Angeles Fire Department

    LAFD Response to EEOC Letter

    Tuesday, October 02, 2007 |

    "The Los Angeles Fire Department is aware of the findings of the determination letter sent to the Personnel Department. This complaint was filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

    The Fire Department takes this and all work place environment issues seriously. It has been and remains our goal to maintain an atmosphere that is conducive to professional development for our members.

    The Department has a policy of a discrimination free work place and has zero tolerance for sexual harassment.

    The Los Angeles Fire Department is working closely with the Mayor’s office to develop and implement a Professional Standards Division (PSD). The PSD will oversee all aspects of the disciplinary system. This will place the Department in a more effective position to address work environment issues."


    Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
    Los Angeles Fire Department

    LAFD Fire Chief Presents Goals and Objectives to Fire Commission

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    Los Angeles Fire Chief Douglas L. Barry presented an overview of his goals and objectives to the Board of Fire Commissioners meeting on October 2, 2007.


    "I offer three Operating Principles for members of the Department to be guided by:

    1. Operate through Teamwork
    2. Operate Ethically and with Integrity
    3. Operate to Position the Department for the Future

    Using these principles as the foundation for reform, the LAFD has begun to make long lasting systemic changes.

    VISION

    My vision has been to establish the Los Angeles Fire Department as a model for other fire departments to emulate in the areas of Emergency Operations, Prevention & preparedness and Work Environment

    GOALS

    To that end, in addition to the Department's on-going goal to provide ever-improving service to the community, the following goals have been established for the coming year:

    • Implementation of the Audit Action Implementation Plan

    • Strengthening of the Department’s Infrastructure

    • Implementation of a Fire Fatality & Hazard Reduction Program

    • Improving Coordination of Homeland Security & Disaster Management efforts

    • Maintaining our leadership role in the region’s efforts to establish radio/data interoperability

    All the while improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the Dept’s budget while keeping within the Mayor’s budget directives.

    CONTROLLER’S AUDIT

    The Controller’s Audit of the Department addressed four specific areas, they are:

    1. Leadership and Communications
    2. Complaints and Disciplinary Process
    3. Human Relations in the Workplace
    4. Drill Tower Recruit Training Academy - (Changed to Recruitment & Retention of Women)

    Below are highlighted areas of progression for the identified areas of the Controller’s Audit.

    • Leadership and Communications

    • Research has been completed of best practices and currently a comprehensive leadership training plan and curriculum is in development.

    • Concurrently, basic leadership principles are being taught in the Fire Captain preparatory class and through our quarterly In-Service training.

    • Establishing several channels of direct communication from the
    Administrative Office

    • Enhanced web communications

    • Implementing the Electronic Library

    • Complaint and Discipline Process:

    • Developed an automated complaint and discipline tracking system to ensure improved documentation and data collection of both complaints and disciplinary actions

    • Established Labor agreements concerning the new disciplinary guidelines that set high standards of behavior and provide consistency in penalties

    • Increased the training of all participants in the disciplinary process and standardized processes for consistency

    MOST IMPORTANTLY We have submitted a plan for a Professional Standards Division that includes elements to greatly improve our overall discipline management.

    The budget package for this new division has been submitted to the Mayor’s Office for approval and funding.

    RELATIONS IN THE WORK PLACE

    A comprehensive Human Relations Training Program has been developed and is beginning to be implemented that enhances our previous HR training efforts and addresses specific areas identified in the audit.

    Human Relations training is currently being presented in the Training Academy and during Quarterly training

    Human Relations understanding will also be included as a tested component during the promotional process

    Recruitment and Retention of Women

    The Recruitment Plan focuses on intense mentoring for entry-level candidates from the time they are recruited until they complete probation.

    DEVELOP AND MAINTAIN A STRONG LAFD INFRASTRUCTURE

    1. Technology plan
    2. Increased budget allocations
    3. Completion of T-1 lines in all fire stations for efficient communications
    4. Improved 9-1-1 dispatch operations
    5. Looking at effectiveness of a FIRESTAT system
    6. County & City GIS interface
    7. Capitol Improvement Projects

    FIRE FATALITY HAZARD REDUCTION PROGRAM

    1. Focuses on residential properties
    2. Increased public awareness campaign
    3. Targets elderly, young and low income communities

    HOMELAND SECURITY & DISASTER MANAGEMENT

    1. Effective intelligence information gathering and sharing
    2. Collaborative planning relative to response, mitigation and recovery from critical incidents
    3. Comprehensive training, support and analysis for the command and management of large scale incidents
    4. Maintain liaisons with associated entities
    5. Raise community and private sector awareness of potential threats

    INTEROPERABILITY

    1. Developed among the region
    2. Using a trunked system will be more cost effective
    3. Sharing of repeaters allows for stronger signals
    4. Provides for automatic backup of systems across region
    5. Safety Equipment interoperable"


    Submitted by Ron Myers, Spokesman
    Los Angeles Fire Department

    Clarence Darrow and the Bombing of the L.A. Times

    Monday, October 01, 2007 |

    97 years ago today.

    From the Los Angeles Fire Department Historical Archive...

    "From 1886 to 1917, Harrison Gray Otis was the owner and publisher of the Los Angeles Times. During that time the newspaper pursued a strong conservative viewpoint, and was militantly anti-union in its editorials and in its relationship with employees.

    On October 1, 1910, in the middle of a strike called to unionize the metal trades of the city, the Times building was dynamited. The south wall facing Broadway Street collapsed, causing the second floor to also collapse under the weight of its machines onto the first floor. The first floor then collapsed into the basement, destroying the heating plant and gas mains. The building, with many of its workers trapped inside, was soon an inferno. There was a loss of life of at least 20, and about the same number were injured, some of them permanently.

    The Los Angeles Fireman carrying the casket is J. L. Constantine. Click to view more photos...

    In an unusual move the mayor hired a private investigator who was able to implicate a number of men in the bombing. These included Ortie McManigal, James B. McNamara, and his brother John J. McNamara (secretary-treasurer of the International Union of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers). McManigal agreed to testify against the McNamara brothers.

    Organized labor, in turn, saw this as an all-out attack on the unions and labor in general. Samuel Gompers, president of the American Federation of Labor, hired Clarence Darrow to defend the brothers. Darrow called them "pawns in a vast industrial war."

    By the time the trial began, however, Darrow had come to the conclusion that the brothers were guilty. Rather than fighting a hopeless battle, he persuaded the brothers to plead guilty. That decision stunned the city and inferiorated the Gompers (sic).

    James McNamara got a life sentence, while his brother received a sentence of 15 years. Two others, David Caplan and Matt A. Schmidt, were later implicated and received life sentences. The damage from the trial was to plague Clarence Darrow for the rest of his life." [additional photos and information]



    Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
    Los Angeles Fire Department