The Busiest Fire Stations in Los Angeles

Saturday, August 04, 2007 |

Did you know that the Los Angeles Fire Department averaged 2,098 responses each day throughout the months of January, February and March 2007?

During this quarter-year period, LAFD resources made 188,837 responses to 90,847 emergency incidents. This represents a 4.6% increase in incidents and a 3.9% increase in responses compared to the same three-month period the year before.

Today, we'd like to offer you a glimpse at the Ten Busiest Fire Stations in the City of Los Angeles.



  1. Fire Station 9 - Central City
    55 responses per day


  2. Fire Station 64 - South Los Angeles
    52 responses per day


  3. Fire Station 57 - South Los Angeles
    51 responses per day


  4. Fire Station 33 - South Los Angeles
    48 responses per day


  5. Fire Station 46 - Coliseum Area
    47 responses per day


  6. Fire Station 66 - Southwest Los Angeles/Hyde Park
    47 responses per day


  7. Fire Station 39 - Van Nuys
    45 responses per day


  8. Fire Station 11 - Westlake/MacArthur Park
    41 responses per day


  9. Fire Station 27 - Hollywood
    41 responses per day


  10. Fire Station 61 - Fairfax/Park LaBrea
    39 responses per day


Thankfully, our City's leaders are keenly aware of the burgeoning demands placed upon Firefighters, and continue to make the many life safety services we provide a top priority.

Are we in some way "proud" of these numbers? Not really. In many cases these responses could have been prevented through more prudent, safe or healthy behavior by those we serve - or by expanded efforts in life safety education and fire prevention.

While working hard with members of the community to address these challenges, rest assured that the men and women of the LAFD remain focused not on numbers, but on the quality of care and service provided to those who visit, reside and work in America's second-largest city.

At the LAFD it's never about numbers, it's *always* about doing our best!


Submitted by Brian Humphrey, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

15 comments:

Ashley said...

Thanks for the eye-opening statistics regarding the responses at the ten busiest firehouses in the City of Los Angeles.

It is amazing that the firefighters and paramedics at these stations are able to keep up with their other duties (fire inspections, safety talks, etc) and chores around the station with all of these incidents.

I would have to assume that the firefighters and paramedics are just worn out by the time they get off of work the next day.

A citizen would think that the LAFD is understaffed by looking at whole picture.

Please compare these numbers:

Los Angeles has 3,594 firefighters who protect 3.8 million citizens with about 730,000 responses per year.

Houston has 3,752 firefighters who protect 1.9 million citizens with about 384,000 responses per year.

Chicago has 4,314 firefighters who protect 2.8 million citizens. I could not find their call volume stats.

It is my opinion that the LAFD is understaffed. I hope that the city leaders would look at these numbers to come up solutions that would enhance the number of firefighters. This would also enhance the quality of service that the LAFD is able to provide to their customers who are the citizens and visitors of the LA.

It would be interesting if a video documentary company would produce a video (example: "10's First In") about one of these busy fire stations. It would be a great experience to see what goes on daily with these busy but dedicated firefighters and paramedics.

Keep up the hard and dedicated work LAFD!

Ashley Rogers
Fire Buff
Arkansas

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Ashley,

Thanks for the note, and the thought-provoking comments.

The 'video' you mention will indeed be the topic of a future posting on this blog when I return to Los Angeles next week.

As they say, stay tuned!

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

...and the video I promised, can be found here.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the detailed info. Any way to summarize what types of responses are typical at these stations (e.g. 30% fires, 20% paramedic response needed, etc.)

Thanks, and Cheers!

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous 6:19,

While a backlog of e-mail precludes me from exhaustive research on the individual stats for each of the Fire Stations mentioned above, they largely mimic the Los Angeles Fire Department as a whole.

For the similar time period (First Quarter of 2007), on a Citywide basis each day:

- Emergency Medical Services
82% of incidents (827 per day)

- Structure Fires
1% of incidents (13 per day)

- Other Fires
5% of incidents (45 per day)

- Fire Alarms
6% of incidents (62 per day)

- Rescues
1% of incidents (13 per day)

- Hazards
1% of incidents (10 per day)

- Other Non-EMS
4% of incidents (39 per day)

I hope this information helps. When time permits (please remember this blog is a non-staffed and non-funded endeavor), I hope to do more posts regarding LAFD statistics.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Anonymous said...

Mr. Brian Humphrey PSO

Out of curiosity which station/house went to the most first due structure fires? Thank you for your time.

Anonymous said...

Mr. H:

You say this blog is non-staffed and non-funded?

When do you do the posting?

Aren't you staff? Don't you receive a paycheck?

Or do you and the other staff who post here do it on your own time?

Thanks.

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous 8:49,

Thanks for the note. Please allow me to reply not merely to you, but also to others who may come across this thread.

As time permits, I'll be happy to look into those statistics.

Please know that I'm on the east coast this week, and face a mountain of e-mail on my return.

That much said, the quality of any answer I might offer can be easily obfuscated by one's personal definition of 'went to' and 'structure fire'.

I know it may sound like splitting hairs, but for those of us who deal formally with statistics (and detest those who obsessively seek to parallel quantity and quality), it can prevent a universe of misunderstanding.

A fire company that 'buys into' a call, or one that is sent by dispatch to what the previous day was a structure fire, but is now exclusively an overhaul may or may not meet the perception that someone may have in hearing an answer to your question.

Please know that I will be pleased to frame my answer with those variables when I find the time, hopefully late next week!

In closing, I will always ask folks to very closely read the closing paragraphs of the posting above before I talk about statistics.

It really isn't about the numbers, it's about us striving for and achieving our best. :)

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous 2:45.

Thanks for the note. You wrote...

Mr. H:

Please, make it Brian.

You say this blog is non-staffed and non-funded?

Yes, in the strictest technical sense. There is no job description or person *assigned* [emphasis added] the task of creating or maintaining the LAFD News & Information blog, nor are there any budgeted (i.e. line item) funds *assigned* to same.

When do you do the posting?

Whenever I can find the time.

Often times (like now, sitting in a hotel room in Maryland) it is in my own spare time, sometimes - especially in regards to incident reports, it is during my normal platoon duty.

Aren't you staff?

Yes, I am.

Don't you receive a paycheck?

As a career member of the LAFD, I am paid for my many core responsibilities, and sometimes offered overtime for ancillary projects that I cannot complete in my 24-hour tour of duty.

Thanks.

You are welcome. If you have any further questions of a personal nature, please don't hesitate to give me a call at LAFD Headquarters, and I'll be pleased to answer them.

Now back to our regularly scheduled programming...

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Andrew said...

Hey Brian,

I know that your real busy, but I was just curious when you get the time, if you know the number of greater alarm structure fires and working fires that occured last year.

Thanks very much for your

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Andrew,

Thanks for the note, and for patiently awaiting a reply.

By a broad definition, the LAFD has dozens of working fires each day among our 116 daily incidents specifically related to fires or fire alarms.

If one was to focus on open flame or burning products within or threatening a *structure*, it would be approximately 10-14 'working' fires each day.

As is inferred above and mentioned in previous replies, arcane definitions and hairs-breadth criteria must be agreed upon to properly compare and contrast such statistics.

While the number of LAFD 'Greater Alarm' fires might seem to be an important benchmark, our internal focus remains on the most-telling statistic of unit/hour utilization, manifested by calculating overall 'emergency hours worked' (of a given LAFD unit and assigned personnel), a figure itself that can be analyzed against a particular type of incident or other category.

It is therefore such numbers and other criteria that you may see mentioned in our published quarterly reports (example) as well as voluminous internal documents that guide LAFD planning.

I offer this long-winded caveat as part of my answer to help explain that our office does not *formally* [emphasis added] tally Greater Alarm incidents over a given timespan. There just isn't a clear (scientific) benefit in doing so when we have the 'emergency hours worked', injuries, fatalities, dollar loss and other criteria.

While it would would seem relatively simple to cull the number of LAFD incidents to which 8 or more fire companies were dispatched among our (current 2,074) daily responses, the formal definition of a Greater Alarm requires we affirm that each and every unit above the threshold is assigned, committed -and- working at the incident, and not cancelled or held in staging, etc.

So.....

The best (non-scientific) estimate I can offer you (from home at the moment) is that our (lightly staffed media and public relations) office produced more than 125 significant fire incident reports last calendar year to which 8 or more companies were assigned, committed and working.

IMPORTANT NOTE: There were certainly many other 'type' (non-fire) incidents that met established criteria for creating our reports (200+ of them in 2007), as well as significant fires (i.e. small but fatal blazes) at which only one or two fire companies were required to handle.

There were also times during calendar year 2007 that our office was overwhelmed with activity or administratively assigned other tasks as 'Priority One', that we did not have the staff or resources to create a significant incident report for a blaze that might have crossed the Greater Alarm threshold.

So yes, the "more than 125" in a year's time is really a light-sided estimate of a criteria that our office only loosely monitors.

I hope this simple but verbose explanation helps. If you have need for more detailed data, please let me know, and I can connect you with LAFD staff who can formally tap the mainframe for a more unique or focused 'slice of the pie'.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Andrew said...

Ok thanks Brian, do all the greater alarm structure fires get sent out over the yahoo group lafd, and/or working fires?
And was there a website that had some statistics of which firehouse was the busiest for structure fires, I thought it was monthly or quarterly, I can't recall?
Thanks again, very much for your time.

Andrew

Andrew said...

Ok thanks Brian, do all the greater alarm structure fires get sent out over the yahoo group lafd, and/or working fires?
And was there a website that had some statistics of which firehouse was the busiest for structure fires, I thought it was monthly or quarterly, I can't recall?
Thanks again, very much for your time.

Andrew

kyle said...

about how many calls does station 79, and station 49 get a day?

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Kyle,

Thanks for the note. With staff cutbacks at LAFD Headquarters and an at-times oppressive workload, we regretfully have not been able to gather that info.

Though we have the overall Battalion 6 & Battalion 13 numbers:

- During calendar year 2010 LAFD units working in our 6th Battalion handled 16,651 incidents.

- During calendar year 2010 LAFD units working in our 13th Battalion handled 55,189 incidents.

...our office hasn't yet had the staff time or tech support to drill down to the station level for calendar year 2010. When such information is available, it will likely be resposited at the LAFD Planning Section. We welcome you to give them a call at (213) 978-3845.

We hope this information helps.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

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