Two Dead After Train Crashes Into Car

Sunday, August 20, 2006 |

Sunday, August 20, 2006 at 9:03 AM, four Companies of Los Angeles Firefighters, seven LAFD Rescue Ambulances, one Heavy Rescue, two EMS Battalion Captains, one Battalion Chief Officer Command Team, under the direction of Battalion Chief Raymundo Gomez responded to a Traffic Collision involving a Metro Blue Line train and a passenger car.

First units reported that the Blue Line Train light rail train had collided with a private vehicle and four people were trapped inside the car. Firefighters quickly assessed the 4 victims and declared two fatalities, and two with critical injuries.

The vehicle's occupants with critical injuries, a 55 year old female and a 7 year old male, were transported to Los Angeles County USC Medical Center.

There were approximately 200 passengers on the train, 7 of which sustained minor neck and back injuries. Of the 7 minor injuries, 6 were transported to local hospitals in good condition.

The cause of the accident is under investigation by Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department and the Los Angeles Police Department.

(images) (slideshow)


Submitted by Brian Ballton
Los Angeles Fire Department

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14 comments:

Aaron B. Hockley said...

I suspect the cause will be found as "people didn't yield to the train, as required by law". Just like pretty much every other train-vs-vehicle collision.

Physics dictates all.

Anonymous said...

First of all, the 2 killed were not 40years old. Cesar was 25 and his sister Maria was 17. 2ndly Regardless of who's fault it is, the MTA should make an effort to make the intersections they cross safer. A innocent little boy was fighting for his life. Now he's gotta long way to recovery. He didn't deserve this

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Mr. Hockley:

Thanks for visiting our blog. Your comments are duly noted.

Dear Anonymous:

From the passionate sound of your comments, we surmise that you are a friend or family member of those in the car.

Kindly accept our condolences for your loss and pain that you continue to suffer as a result of this senseless incident.

Though I have yet to perform an exhaustive search of our official statements related to this incident, I've yet to see mention of the "forty year-old" figure you mention

Please know that we make all possible efforts to offer both timely and accurate information, which is often difficult in such collisions.

As time permits this morning, I will scour our published records and seek to offer more generic information to replace any specific mention I may find that mentions "forty year olds".

In closing, please extend to the survivors our best wishes for a speedy recovery.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Anonymous said...

Anthony is alive and that's what really matters most. It breaks my heart that my little boy had to go through that. Anf I hate to think of what he saw. I am trying to contact the LAFD who were there and who helped save my little boy's life. But in case I can't, PLEASE tell them that I thank them from the bottom of my heart. He's actually doing very well, considering what happened. He's still at the hospital and will be for a few more weeks. Maybe 2 wks. He has been transfered to Women's and Childrens. He's awake, and alert. Just some stuff he needs to overcome and relearn due to the brain injury. So THANK YOU very much. I just wish this could have been avoided. It hurts.

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Thank you for sharing the welcome news of Anthony's survival. That is truly an answer to the prayers of all who have been touched by or remain involved by this incident - including the many who read our blog.

Please know that the contact information you provided to Ron Myers via telephone, has been given to me.

I will be contacting the Firefighters and Paramedics who responded that day with the good news about Anthony, and offering them your information for future contact.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Anonymous said...

I saw the comment that idiot wrote. He was being a smart-ass. Besides, I guarantee you, not one person really saw what happened. They just wanted to be on T.V. I've seen many times how people here in los angeles ignore when someone is getting hurt, or has been hurt. And when someone has passed out in the middle of the street, and not one person goes to help. When I first moved here to la in 1998I had to watch a guy get jumped by 4 other guys, and the person is laying in the middle of a restaurant driveway, the police even drive by, and no one did anything. People here are numb. They ignore everything when it comes to violence, accidents, and what not. But let the news come around and everyone saw something. And to top it off, even the news gets stuff wrong. It's annoying. Even the news are only after a story. No one seems to really care unless they can gain something. I bet the news wouldn't care about how hard its been before the accident. Youknow what? I can complain til I turn blue in the face, and nothing would change. What's mportant is how can we prevent this from happening again??

Anonymous said...

Thank You for responding so quickly. As for correcting the ages, its ok. I guess it's really not that important. Let's just move on and hope no one else has to go through this. I saw a news video on line about the accident for the first time. I had been refusing to read the news or watch tv. What I saw was horrible. I saw when they had anthony on the strecher and I saw him Reach his hand torward the sky. Towards heaven. He was awake??? When I saw the car, I cried. How? Why?? These are my questions. How did he survive???? I don't know what to do or think sometimes. Bkut if it weren't for all those fireman and emt's, he wouldn't be here. I look forward to speaking with them. Thanks again. Time to go to the hospital, so take care and please keep anthony in your prayers

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous wrote...

What's mportant is how can we prevent this from happening again??

Indeed, and in their honor and those of all who suffer injury and death from such senseless incidents, we can engage in dialogue with our friends and family, as well as local road and rail officials, and especially those working in (transit and vehicle) driver education and law enforcement.

Without placing blame, and merely looking forward to protecting all who are vulnerable, we suggest the Operation Lifesaver website as a great source for educational materials:

www.oli.org

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Anonymous said...

I don't have family here. Just my son and daughter

Ina said...

My name is Christina, and my son Anthony, is the innocent 7 year old that almost lost his life. And he was not wearing a seat-belt. Regardless, for those of you who care, He's doing great considering what happened. He's gotta get some therapy and stuff but he's walking and doing his best to talk. SO...I REALLY WOULD LIKE TO thank those fireman that helped save his life. I know its something you do everyday, but believe me, it's appreciated. He's my 1st born and my only son. I don't know what I would have done if I lost him. So thank you very much. YOu guys are my heros for life. And I know ANthony's happy about it too. I was told station #9 was his transport. So also wanna thank you as well. I'm not much for words, so im sure you know how appreciative I feel, and I hope you guys all take care. And thanks for giving my son the chance to grow up.

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Christina:

Thanks for the note, and the update. We not only want your son to grow, but to prosper in countless ways.

I have left a message for the team of Firefighters and Paramedics who responded that day.

Their 'platoon' (group of Firefighters and Paramedics who work together) is presently on their extended cycle of days off

I'm hoping that you will hear from them on Sunday, Tuesday or Thursday (their scheduled duty days this coming week).

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Anonymous said...

Soon to date will be two years since my cousins passed away. It left our family with deep scars in losing them. They were the comedians in our family and were very much loved. What saddenss me the most is that the City of Los Angeles has not put up any type of safety along Washington Blvd. How many more Angels' does the City of Los Angeles have too lose before anything is done?
MISS U GUYS

LAFD Media and Public Relations said...

Anonymous 9:03,

I hope to join you in taking a moment next Wednesday morning to think of Cesar and Maria and to pray for Anthony.

May each of us take that moment to further our resolve in remaining safe in our travels, and to do whatever we can to prevent such senseless tragedies in the future.

Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

Brian Humphrey
Firefighter/Specialist
Public Service Officer
Los Angeles Fire Department

Christina T said...

5 years later and Anthony is doing great. A lil bit of after effects from the accident, but basically a normal 12 year old boy.

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